Tag Archives: exercise

Young women falling short of exercise recommendations

Cassie Chew

About Cassie Chew

Based in Washington, D.C., Chew covers health care policy for a variety of media outlets. She has been published in Stat News, Politico, Provider Magazine, Modern Healthcare and BloombergBNA.

Photo: Peter Dutton via Flickr

Many young women in recent weeks have walked across a stage in cap and gown to accept their hard-earned high school diplomas. But recent research says the transition into adulthood comes with quickly forgetting lessons from their physical education classes.

Recent data analysis of findings from a long-running health study finds that women in their late teens and 20s are less physically active than their male counterparts, failing to meet minimum recommendations for exercise. Continue reading

Active aging tip sheet highlights benefits of proactive wellness efforts

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

There’s aging, and then there’s active aging. The former happens to a person. The latter allows the person to take back some control of the aging process by living a healthier lifestyle and remaining engaged in all aspects of life.

Active aging is both a movement and a life plan. Staying as fully active as possible can change the way we age, according to the International Council on Active Aging. Continue reading

What Pokémon Go could mean for health care

Rebecca Vesely

About Rebecca Vesely

Rebecca Vesely is AHCJ's topic leader on health information technology and a freelance writer. She has written about health, science and medicine for AFP, the Bay Area News Group, Modern Healthcare, Wired, Scientific American online and many other news outlets.

The story angles for Pokémon Go appear to be almost as limitless as the game’s sudden and phenomenal popularity.

Pokémon Go is a fitness story. Pokémon Go is a mental health story. Pokémon Go is a marketing story. And, my favorite, Pokémon Go is a story about tired dogs.

What can Pokémon Go tell us about the future of health care? Continue reading

Rise in obesity among older adults will increase burden on health system

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDCPrevalence of Self-Reported Obesity Among U.S. Adults by State and Territory

Obesity in older adults is a very real and growing challenge. Since 1991, there’s been a steady increase in obesity rates among both men and women in the 55 and older age bracket.

In just one year (from 2013 to 2014), a Gallup poll found that the greatest increase in obesity was among the 65-plus age group (from 26.3 to 27.9 percent). A small annual increase can result in a lot of extra pounds over the years. This likely will put the health system under additional strain as baby boomers age into Medicare and as people live longer with weight-related chronic disease. Continue reading

Aging brains benefit from higher intensity physical exercise, study indicates

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: Louise Mackie via Flickr

Photo: Louise Mackie via Flickr

More confirmation on the benefits of exercise for older adults.

In a recent study, those who reported doing little to no exercise showed greater long-term decline in memory and thinking skills, compared with those having high activity levels. The difference was equivalent to 10 years of aging, according to researchers at the University of Miami, Florida, and Columbia University, New York. Continue reading