Tag Archives: wearables

Freelance writer finds wearable technology can boost health

About Karen Blum

Karen Blum is AHCJ’s core topic leader on health IT. An independent journalist in the Baltimore area, she has written health IT stories for publications such as Pharmacy Practice News, Clinical Oncology News, Gastroenterology & Endoscopy News, General Surgery News and Infectious Disease Special Edition.

Andrea King Collier

Andrea King Collier

Can you use wearable devices to improve your fitness and health? AHCJ member Andrea King Collier, an independent journalist in Michigan, was determined to find out.

In an article for AARP The Magazine, Collier detailed her experience trying several portable technologies for a 30-day period. She not only had an interesting experience but lost 10 pounds in the process and received positive feedback from family and friends. As an added bonus, Collier’s story won a gold award for AARP from the National Mature Media Awards. Continue reading

Summit of tech giants takes on the cloud and improving patient data interoperability

About Rebecca Vesely

Rebecca Vesely is AHCJ's topic leader on health information technology and a freelance writer. She has written about health, science and medicine for AFP, the Bay Area News Group, Modern Healthcare, Wired, Scientific American online and many other news outlets.

At a developer conference hosted at the White House last week, six of the biggest tech companies issued a joint statement in support of health IT interoperability. It’s another sign that tech behemoths are serious about taming the vast and often unmanageable health data ecosystem – and getting their piece of it.

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Making sense of Amazon and Apple’s health care forays

About Rebecca Vesely

Rebecca Vesely is AHCJ's topic leader on health information technology and a freelance writer. She has written about health, science and medicine for AFP, the Bay Area News Group, Modern Healthcare, Wired, Scientific American online and many other news outlets.

Photo: NayverM via Flickr

Tech giants Amazon and Apple both made waves in recent weeks for announcements that some interpreted as a first stab at disrupting the health care sector.

Plenty of observers have offered opinions on whether tech companies can truly shift the (often frightfully unmovable) machinations of the health care system.

Let’s take a look at the reality and how journalists might find fresh angles in the months ahead. Continue reading

Examining ‘alternative facts’ in patient data

About Rebecca Vesely

Rebecca Vesely is AHCJ's topic leader on health information technology and a freelance writer. She has written about health, science and medicine for AFP, the Bay Area News Group, Modern Healthcare, Wired, Scientific American online and many other news outlets.

telehealthIn this era of “alternative facts,” everyone should read Sue Halpern’s piece, “They Have, Right Now, Another You,” published in the New York Review of Books in late December.

The piece, along with several recent studies on the accuracy of electronic health records, adds to the growing question over what types of data we can trust. And more important, how can we know the difference between bad and good data. Continue reading

These health tech buzzwords are out; cost control is in, so say investors

About Rebecca Vesely

Rebecca Vesely is AHCJ's topic leader on health information technology and a freelance writer. She has written about health, science and medicine for AFP, the Bay Area News Group, Modern Healthcare, Wired, Scientific American online and many other news outlets.

fitness-trackerWellness apps. Wearables. Middleware. Big data.

These buzzwords circulating around the health tech world are out, so declared a panel of health investors last week.

Products that reduce costs and/or improve efficiencies are in, they said.

The shift was striking after years of direct-to-consumer and wellness applications taking center stage at tech confabs and in the media.

Health reporters get pitches on digital health products all the time. Keeping up with what investors are looking for in new products and technologies can help us gauge the value of the pitch. Continue reading