Tag Archives: dementia

Health and aging stories to follow in 2017

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in Kaiser Health News, The Atlantic.com, New America Media, AARP.com and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College in New York City, and co-produces HealthStyles for WBAI-FM/Pacifica Radio.

Photo: Joy Weinberg via Flickr

Photo: Joy Weinberg via Flickr

The new year heralds a new administration and much uncertainty about what lies ahead for older adults’ health care. There are threats (or promises) to privatize Medicare, cut elder-friendly programs such as the SNAP supplemental nutrition program, revamp Social Security, eliminate CMS demo programs and more.

From science to community-based care, here are some issues to put on your beat’s radar for 2017: Continue reading

Experts recommend cognitive decline screening for everyone over age 70

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in Kaiser Health News, The Atlantic.com, New America Media, AARP.com and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College in New York City, and co-produces HealthStyles for WBAI-FM/Pacifica Radio.

Photo: Neil Moralee via Flickr

Photo: Neil Moralee via Flickr

World experts in aging for the first time are recommending that everyone age 70 and older have routine brain health screenings.

At a recent conference of the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics, in St. Louis, a consensus panel examined the importance of early recognition of impaired cognitive health. They concluded that annual memory and reasoning ability evaluation by a physician or health provider is an important step toward enhancing brain health for aging populations throughout the world.

Continue reading

Dementia training standards vary widely throughout U.S.

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in Kaiser Health News, The Atlantic.com, New America Media, AARP.com and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College in New York City, and co-produces HealthStyles for WBAI-FM/Pacifica Radio.

Photo: BBC Radio 4 via Flickr

Photo: BBC Radio 4 via Flickr

A new survey of state laws around dementia training reveals a patchwork of requirements and standards across settings, professional licensure and personnel. It found that existing laws and training are not keeping up with the growing needs of people who are cognitively impaired.

The survey and accompanying analyses looked at existing laws and gaps in training, as well as required curriculums in all 50 states, plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Continue reading

Report emphasizes worldwide toll of dementia on women

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in Kaiser Health News, The Atlantic.com, New America Media, AARP.com and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College in New York City, and co-produces HealthStyles for WBAI-FM/Pacifica Radio.

A new report highlights just how much more likely women are to be affected by dementia than men around the world. Not only are the majority of people living with or at risk of developing the disease female, but women are also the majority of caregivers and health professionals in most countries.

Women and Dementia: A Global Research Review” from Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) calls for a broader, evidence-based approached to female-targeted dementia health programs. The need is particularly strong in low- and middle-income countries, where female-led caregiving is the principal care model. Continue reading

Is early-onset Alzheimer’s getting the attention it deserves?

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in Kaiser Health News, The Atlantic.com, New America Media, AARP.com and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College in New York City, and co-produces HealthStyles for WBAI-FM/Pacifica Radio.

Julianne Moore just won a Golden Globe for her vivid portrayal of the title character in “Still Alice.” The movie, which opens Friday, is based on a novel about a college professor diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. What makes this story so compelling is that it details the devastating toll on both Alice and her family from Alice’s perspective.

While stories about cognitive decline in middle-aged former athletes have made news for some time, the making of this movie points to how the problem is moving into the mainstream and a new willingness to address it. WBUR recently profiled 64-year old journalist Greg O’Brien – who’s been writing about his ongoing battle with the disease since his diagnosis five years ago. Reporter Kim Lemon did a three-part series for WGAL-Susquehanna Valley, Pa., prompted by her husband’s diagnosis. Gary Rotstein describes his journey to craft a multi-year series for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about a 57-year old man’s long-term efforts to cope with his diagnosis. Continue reading