Tag Archives: insurance

Making sense of how the new tax bill will impact health care

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org. Follow her on Facebook.

Photo by Sean Stayte via flickr.

The House and the Senate both have passed tax bills which have provisions that will deeply affect health care, ranging from the repeal of the individual mandate to repeal of a tax credit meant to help businesses comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Since the bills are not identical, the final legislation must first be negotiated in a conference committee. Not all the provisions will survive, although the final bill most likely will more closely resemble the Senate version, which includes repealing the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate. Continue reading

These reports can provide a useful baseline to assess the administration’s health insurance efforts

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Source: Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data from the January–March 2017 National Health Interview Survey, September 2017. National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey Early Release Program.For January through March of this year, the rate of Americans who were without health insurance was 8.8 percent, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

Whatever actions Congress and the Trump administration ultimately take to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, or in the short term attempt to weaken it, we already know their efforts will affect how many Americans have health insurance. The question now is how much of an effect their efforts will have.

We have sources that can provide a baseline for discussion, such as the National Center for Health Statistics’ (NCHS) National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Gallup Sharecare Well-Being Index. Both resources base their data on surveys and are regularly updated. Continue reading

CBO: If Trump kills Obamacare subsidies, expect premiums and deficit to soar

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Donald J. Trump

In a report that aligns with predictions by health insurers and groups such as the Kaiser Family Foundation, the Congressional Budget Office on Tuesday forecast that ending cost-sharing reduction (CSR) subsidies under the Affordable Care Act not only would raise premiums for some low-income Americans, but also increase the federal deficit by $194 billion by 2026.

Congressional Democrats had asked both the CBO and the Joint Committee on Taxation to estimate the effect of cutting CSRs after this December – as President Trump has threatened – on the federal budget, health insurance coverage, market stability and premiums. Continue reading

ACA repeal efforts move to the next stage – whatever that may be

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org. Follow her on Facebook.

The Affordable Care Act last week survived yet another near-death experience – but the story isn’t over.

What’s next, though, is not yet clear. Here are a few possibilities, with the caveat that so much is in flux anything can happen: Continue reading

Experts outline framework to address health care consolidations

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org. Follow her on Facebook.

Photo: Norman Mosjos via Flickr

The wave of mergers and acquisitions in health care in the age of reform hasn’t stopped – and three top-notch health policy experts in a recent guest post in Forbes explain why we should worry about that.

Continue reading