Tag Archives: aging in place

Aging in place panelists explore what’s working to keep seniors living at home

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Almost every older adult — about 90% according to AARP — will tell you that they want to remain in their own home or in their community as they age. However, that can be a challenge as health issues mount, frailty takes hold or barriers like stairs seem insurmountable. Aging in place is often more easily said than done.

Challenges of social isolation, lack of nearby family to help, or appropriate, safe housing are among the biggest roadblocks to successful aging in place, according to the National Institutes on Aging. While some older adults can afford to hire caregivers who can help them with the various tasks of daily living such as bathing, dressing, or meal preparation, many cannot. Continue reading

Report focuses on challenges of disaster preparedness for older adults

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: macprohawaii (U.S. Geological Survey) via Flickr

Older adults can be especially vulnerable to natural disasters, be it a hurricane, tornado, earthquake, or the recent eruptions from Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano. On top of health concerns, they often are socially isolated and lack good transportation options that can slow their response before, during and after a disaster.

Continue reading

Community paramedics help medically complex homebound avoid hospitalization

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: Liz Seegert/AHCJBernard Cunniffe, shown with his wife Beverly, was assisted by his city’s Community Paramedics initiative after an accident.

Photo: Liz Seegert/AHCJBernard Cunniffe, shown with his wife Beverly, was assisted by his city’s Community Paramedics initiative after an accident.

When 84-year old Bernard Cunniffe fell in the bathroom one morning, his wife called the paramedics. However, rather than transporting the retired NYPD officer  to the emergency department, the specially-trained responders assessed him for trauma, evaluated his vital signs and settled him into his bed.

Cunniffe, who is homebound because of multiple medical conditions, was uninjured but had low oxygen saturation, the likely cause of the fall. The community paramedics quickly stabilized him in consultation with an on-call physician and avoided a trip to the hospital. The Cunniffes were thrilled with the experience. Continue reading

Continuing care retirement communities: Another version of aging in place

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: The Pointe at Kilpatrick via Flickr

Photo: The Pointe at Kilpatrick via Flickr

On a recent visit to south Florida, I met a quite extraordinary 90-year-old named Jules. He’s a former high-level business executive, who still practices law and sells real estate as a second-act career. Jules lives in a Type A continuing care retirement community (CCRC) that feels more like a luxury hotel than a place for “old people.”

The former Connecticut resident described how much he loves the independent living facility, which is very similar to a luxury high rise. There’s a full service dining room — jackets required for men — that features healthy daily gourmet dinner specials like baked salmon. Linen tablecloths and wood paneling makes it feel like an upscale restaurant.  There’s also a well-stocked communal library, common living room and card/game room off the lobby. Continue reading

Livable design helps baby boomers age at home

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Image by David Illig via flickr.

Image by David Illig via flickr.

Unlike past generations of retirees, most aging baby boomers say they want to remain in their own homes as they get older, yet most don’t make the appropriate renovations to do so. A survey of boomer-age adults shows that while 40 percent plan to remodel their homes, only 21 percent think about their own health and aging as part of those plans.

However, when universal design features are pointed out, the majority said they would consider including them. Continue reading

Advances, policy shifts offer more encouragement for aging-in-place movement

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Image by David Illig via flickr.

Given a choice, most older adults prefer aging-in-place rather than moving to a nursing home or assisted-living facility. Unfortunately, older homes and apartments frequently pose safety hazards for seniors – from lack of grab bars in the bathroom to shelves too high to reach without a ladder.

Associated Press Medical Writer Lauran Neergaard describes this scenario – and what can be done about it – in her recent piece, “Home repair for health? Simple fix-ups may keep low-income seniors independent.” Although I first read the article on The Christian Science Monitor website, (with an AP credit), this is an issue that strikes a chord in communities throughout the United States, and in Canada, too.

Aging-in-place presents numerous challenges for seniors. Something as routine as traveling to a doctor appointment for chronic disease management becomes burdensome if there are difficulties with activities of daily living and transportation, poor understanding of care plans, confusion about prescriptions, or mild cognitive impairment which affects ability to follow a plan or care or remember instructions. Visits by nurse practitioners and home health care nurses are important elements for successful aging in place. Medication reconciliation, monitoring of vital signs, nutritional and mental health checks, and a friendly face can sometimes mean the difference between living at home or an institution, especially if caregivers are not nearby. Continue reading