Category Archives: Uncategorized

AHCJ mourns loss of healthjournalism.org editor Pia Christensen

Pia ChristensenPia Christensen, AHCJ’s longtime website editor, died May 4, 2021, from cancer at her home in Loomis, Calif. Christensen, 50, served as managing editor/online services for the past 15 years and as part of the Missouri School of Journalism staff for the past 20 years.

“We’ve experienced a terrible loss in our AHCJ family,” said Senior Adviser Len Bruzzese, who hired Pia at Investigative Reporters and Editors in 2001 and then “stole her away” to AHCJ in 2006. “It’s a loss to an organization that needed her, to a membership that adored her, and especially to a staff who worked with her, laughed with her and shared so many daily ups and downs with her.” Continue reading

Welcome AHCJ’s newest members

About Andrew Smiley

Andrew Smiley is the executive director of AHCJ and its Center for Excellence in Health Care Journalism, and an assistant professor at the Missouri School of Journalism. Smiley comes to AHCJ from a sports broadcasting background, including nearly a decade at the Golf Channel/NBC Sports and a decade at ESPN, where he won an Emmy.

Welcome new membersPlease welcome these new professional and student members to AHCJ.

All new members are welcome to stop by this post’s comment section to introduce themselves. Continue reading

Where to get more answers about COVID-19

About Bara Vaida and Tara Haelle

Bara Vaida is AHCJ's core topic leader on infectious diseases. An independent journalist, she has written extensively about health policy and infectious diseases. Tara Haelle is medical studies core topic leader, guiding journalists through the jargon of science and research and helping them translate evidence into accurate information.

Photo: NIAID-RML via FlickrAn electron microscope image of SARS-CoV-2 — also known as 2019-nCoV — which is the virus that causes COVID-19.

There are still many unknowns about the COVID-19 outbreak, which as of February 26, has sickened more than 81,000 people and killed more than 2,700. See this map to keep up with the figures, which are updated as new information comes in from different countries.

Key questions, such as just how contagious the virus is, how deadly it is and whether there will be widespread transmission outside of China, do not all have precise answers yet. To help answer such questions and others about prevention, the federal public health response, risk factors and similar concerns, the CDC’s COVID-19 FAQ page offers a relatively comprehensive list of questions with succinct answers and links to details. Continue reading

President’s Corner: Issues worth keeping in mind as we head into 2020 elections

About Ivan Oransky, M.D.

Ivan Oransky, M.D., president of AHCJ's board of directors, is vice president, editorial, at Medscape and a Distinguished Writer In Residence at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. He blogs at Embargo Watch and at Retraction Watch. Follow him at @IvanOransky.

When it comes to debates over health care policy, there are a number of terms that make veteran reporter Joanne Kenen roll her eyes.

There’s “access,” for example. “Saying you have access doesn’t mean you can really tap into that ‘access,’” says Kenen, executive editor for health at Politico and health reform topic leader for AHCJ. “If I have access to something that costs $25,000, that’s not really access. Who is this protecting and what does this really mean?” In other words, Kenen says, “access means whatever you want it to mean.” Continue reading

AHCJ selects first International Health Study Fellows

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

The Association of Health Care Journalists has awarded its first AHCJ International Health Study Fellowships to four journalists who intend to pursue significant projects in the first half of 2019. The program, supported by The Commonwealth Fund, is meant to help veteran U.S.-based journalists compare elements of the U.S. health system with those of other countries.

The program for mid-career journalists is intended to give print, broadcast and online reporters an opportunity to study how one element of the U.S. health care system is handled in another country and to report on the differences. Fellows will be able to interview patients, health care providers and policymakers both in the United States and abroad.

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