Report looks at limited access to dental health, offers recommendations

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

A report this week from the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council looks at the consequences of inadequate access to oral health care and recommends ways to improve access.

Dentist chair at DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx.

Dentist chair at DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx, where Debra Sperling, D.M.D., does cleanings, fillings, preventive care and applies fluoride sealants to prevent future damage.

The report is set for release on Wednesday but embargoed copies are available to reporters today, beginning at 11 a.m. EDT. The committee that wrote the report will discuss it at a briefing at 1 p.m. Wednesday at the National Press Club, which will be webcast (available at national-academies.org. Reporters can obtain copies of the report or register to attend the briefing by contacting the National Academies’ Office of News and Public Information at 202-334-2138 or news@nas.edu.

Just as with other aspects of health care, children, older adults, and people who live in rural areas are affected by economic, structural, geographic and cultural factors that limit access to dental health care.

Several entries in the Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism have examined oral health care:

Watch for more resources on oral health on the AHCJ website.

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