Tag Archives: robert wood johnson foundation

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grants $450,000 to journalism training, resources

Len Bruzzese

About Len Bruzzese

Len Bruzzese is the executive director of AHCJ and its Center for Excellence in Health Care Journalism. He also is an associate professor at the Missouri School of Journalism and served for nearly 20 years in daily journalism.

The Center for Excellence in Health Care Journalism, the educational arm of the Association of Health Care Journalists, has been awarded a three-year grant renewal of $450,000 by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to continue offering training and resources for journalists covering health issues.

The grant coincides with the 20th anniversary of the AHCJ, which recently conducted Health Journalism 2018 in Phoenix, Ariz. The foundation was an endowing sponsor for that event.

The new funding will continue to support the association’s annual conference, regional workshops on niche health topics, an annual rural health journalism workshop and the expansion of health data resources on AHCJ’s website.

Read more about the grant.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation supports health journalism training efforts with $450,000 grant

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

SANTA CLARA, Calif. – The Center for Excellence in Health Care Journalism, the educational arm of the Association of Health Care Journalists, has been awarded a three-year grant of $450,000 by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to continue offering training and resources for journalists covering health issues.

RWJF announced the grant this week to coincide with Health Journalism 2015, the annual conference of AHCJ, being held April 24-27 in Silicon Valley. RWJF was one of the first supporters of the association, now marking its 17th year.

The funding will support the association’s annual conference, regional workshops on niche health topics, an annual rural health journalism workshop and the building of health data resources on AHCJ’s website healthjournalism.org. Continue reading

Covering Health Issues 6.0, coming soon to a mailbox near you*

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

*Assuming you’re an AHCJ member. If you aren’t a member, then keep in mind that a free copy of each revision of the sourcebook is one of many perks you’ll gain by joining.

covering-health-issues1Thanks to a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Alliance for Health Reform has released the sixth edition of its “Covering Health Issues” sourcebook. Since the fifth edition, released in 2009, editors have added loads of new content, particularly in areas related to the 2010 Affordable Care Act. The free online edition also comes with links to local stories that exemplify sourcebook-inspired reporting. If you can’t wait for your hard copy to arrive, you can also get the full book in PDF format.

As always, the book promises “fast facts, background, tips for reporters, story ideas and experts with contact information,” as well as “an extensive glossary, ideas and examples for TV and radio reporters, and links to polls on health issues.”

For tips on how to take advantage of this resource, scope out this video, presented by AHCJ member and NPR health reporter Julie Rovner.

Health care reform implementation glossary debuts

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

HealthReformGPS, the George Washington University and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation project aimed at making health reform implementation easier to understand, has come out with a glossary of more than 200 key reform terms.

It keeps each entry brief while still covering general ideas, such as “Patient Protections,” as well as more specific ones, such as “Urban Indian” and “Culturally and linguistically appropriate and competent services.” All of this makes it perfect for bookmarking, or for a quick refresher. Take a minute to scan the list and I’m sure you’ll stumble across at least a couple entries that make you say, “Oh, so that’s what that really means.” Chances are, you’ll also come away with a story idea or two to boot.

Understanding the administrative side of implementation

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

Coverage of health care reform implementation has generally focused on the issues and effects of the roll-out, rather than the arcane governmental mechanisms involved. It makes sense, of course, as “here’s how you can now get coverage despite your pre-existing condition” is significantly more relevant to most readers than “23 states miss federal 90-day deadline for creation of high-risk pools, partly because already established pools don’t always conform to reform requirements, and partly because it’s too much hassle and they’d rather let the feds do it for them.”

Service-oriented as it may be, this focus has led to a few gaps in my understanding of the administrative moving parts involved in implementation. Which is why the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s guide to state and federal roles in the implementation of health care reform is such a handy document. It’s worth a quick scan, if only to give all those implementation stories a little context. It’s got everything from “how informal rulemaking becomes law” (hint: it involves both “notice” and “comment”), to the aforementioned business about why some states ceded control of their high-risk pools to the federal government. And it’s only four pages long.

Sourcebook expands ideas for local reporting

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

The latest version of the Covering Health Issues sourcebook has been updated with even more examples of how reporters have used it for local stories. For example, the section on Mental Health and Substance Abuse links to nine related stories and four additional related resources. Those stories included cuts to Tennessee’s mental health agency, a profile of aMichigan troupe that blends acting and therapy and possible changes to mental health care for inmates in California’s Ventura County.

It’s a handy place to check when you’re looking for examples of how to localize certain topics, especially since you’ll also be to pull relevant facts and background from the accompanying chapter of the sourcebook.

The print version of the sourcebook was distributed to AHCJ members last year.