Tag Archives: investigative reporting

‘Top Doctors’ rankings lack standards, oversight

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

It’s going to surprise exactly nobody that the organizations that help sell plaques to physicians might just be in it for the money, but I still have to tip my hat to ABC News for investigating the living daylights out of several such outfits.

The typical business model seems to be “shamelessly flatter any doctor whose contact information you can get your hands on, then refer them to your affiliated plaque salesman. Profit, rinse, repeat.” Nevertheless some doctors and consumers seem to take them seriously, with hospitals pushing their doctors to get listed, and physicians trumpeting their listings on websites and in press releases. Following their lead, ABC treated the listings just as seriously, going so far as to match them with databases of disciplined doctors. They found plenty of matches, including a few examples that were downright spectacular.

Dr. Conrad Murray, convicted of manslaughter for administering a lethal overdose of the anesthetic propofol to Michael Jackson in 2009, is still listed as a “Top Cardiologist,” according to the Consumers’ Research Council of America.

A “Top Pediatrician” according to the Consumers’ Research Council of America is also a convicted serial child rapist charged with the molestation of 103 children. Dr. Earl Bradley is currently serving 14 life sentences in addition to a 160-year prison term, yet he remains on the Consumers’ Research Council of America “Top Pediatrician” list.

Beyond the headline-grabbing details, the reporters go to great lengths to explain the company’s business models and their screening procedures, or lack thereof. My personal favorite was a website, TopDocs.com, whose CEO says he has enticed “a couple of hundred” doctors to pay from $1,500 to $10,000 for a listing, not including the $1,600 annual fee. Yet, the ABC crew writes, “In reference to the actual name ‘TopDocs.com,’ (the CEO) told ABC News, ‘We are not inferring in any way that the doctors in the site are top doctors.'”

Community relies on foreign-educated doctors

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

Armed with reams of data, The Bakersfield Californian‘s Kellie Schmitt charged headlong into the potential minefield of issues surrounding foreign educated-physicians with “Importing Doctors.” The series delivers a thorough take on the ramifications of the fact that the majority of her county’s doctors attended medical school overseas. (The national average, for the record, is around 25 percent).

In addition to her opening piece, which considers the benefits and drawbacks of relying on international medical graduates, Schmitt filed follow-up installments keying in on specific questions raised by her overall investigation. Of particular interest is the clear line she draws between foreign-born physicians who attended medical school in their home country before they came to the United States and American-born physicians who attended schools, often located in Mexico and the Caribbean, that cater to students who were unable to gain admittance to American medical schools. It’s a distinction that a less-nuanced data analysis could easily overlook.

Finally, while the investigation’s results are illuminating, health care journalists will probably be even more interested in Schmitt’s “How we crunched the numbers” sidebar, which can be found on the left sidebar of this story. The paper used data from the state medical board and the American Board of Medical Specialties.

Investigation reveals N.Y. lax on home care oversight

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

In the Albany (N.Y.) Times Union, Matt Drange’s investigation is titled “Home health care in crisis.” Having read the piece, I can say it’s safe to take that declaration at face value. At the very time that home care is booming in New York as a cheaper, more convenient alternative to nursing homes, the state has cut back on its number of health inspectors. Meanwhile, the complexity of home care cases is rising, as hospitals release patients earlier and the population as a whole ages. The results, Drange writes, have been predictable.

Lapses have gone undetected or, in many cases, unpunished by the Department of Health, the arm of state government tasked with overseeing home health agencies. Providers are not required to notify the department when patients experience sudden or unexpected changes in their condition, including death. And even when the state does learn about these incidents, it doesn’t always act on the information, records show.

For the investigation, Drange looked at public records regarding Medicaid billing, home care agency registration and plenty of state inspection reports. He focused his review on 40 of the worst offenders, and found more than enough examples to illustrate a system in crisis. Drange’s anecdotes recount numerous egregious lapses in care, and I strongly recommend digging into the meat of the piece, if only to see what incredible detail he found in public records. For now though, at the risk of mild spoilers, I’ll just reveal that they all end in the same way: The problem goes undetected, unenforced, or underpunished.

In the end, as reporters have found in other states as well, the root of the problem seems to be a weak and vaguely defined regulatory system. In his investigation, for example, Drange found a sharp contrast between the oversight of nursing homes and home care, two institutions which often perform similar functions.

(Researcher Sam Krinsky of the United Healthcare Workers East 1199 Union) said the culture of home care differs vastly from that of nursing homes, which have received more attention in New York and elsewhere.

Statements of deficiencies issued to home care agencies by the Department of Health are “not something that we take seriously,” Krinsky said.

“In nursing homes, the inspections are a big deal. There are a lot more regulations they have to comply with … It’s just a much more robust system,” he said. “In home care, it’s more of a review of paperwork. It [Department of Health] doesn’t have any teeth.”

Your thoughts on this story?

Drange, an AHCJ member and recent graduate of the Columbia Journalism School, did this investigation as his master’s project. He invites feedback from other health care reporters about the story and anything he could have done differently. Feel free to comment below or send your thoughts to him at mattdrange@gmail.com or on Twitter (@mattdrange).

Reuters explains Big Food’s remarkable lobbying success

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

Investigating for Reuters, Duff Wilson and Janet Roberts analyzed lobbying records and found that, in the past few years, the food industry has dramatically stepped up its spending in Washington and, they write, “largely dominated policymaking – pledging voluntary action while defeating government proposals aimed at changing the nation’s diet.” They give examples.

After aggressive lobbying, Congress declared pizza a vegetable to protect it from a nutritional overhaul of the school lunch program this year. The White House kept silent last year as Congress killed a plan by four federal agencies to reduce sugar, salt and fat in food marketed to children.

And during the past two years, each of the 24 states and five cities that considered “soda taxes” to discourage consumption of sugary drinks has seen the efforts dropped or defeated.

At every level of government, the food and beverage industries won fight after fight during the last decade. They have never lost a significant political battle in the United States despite mounting scientific evidence of the role of unhealthy food and children’s marketing in obesity.

That success has come through what the authors imply is a sort of big-tobacco model, in which the industry combines promises of self-regulation with huge amounts of money, and thus creates an irresistible package for lawmakers. For a blow-by-blow on how the lobbying muscle swayed the decision-makers in recent battles, I strongly recommend you read the full piece, which draws heavily from both data and extensive interviews. Particularly interesting? The examples of how the Citizens United decision has impacted far more than just election politics.

Tulsa World investigates billing, compensation at ambulance utility

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

The Tulsa World‘s Ziva Branstetter has, for months now, been doggedly investigating the billing practices of the Emergency Medical Services Authority, an agency that provides ambulance service to many residents in and around Tulsa and Oklahoma City. The service is largely funded by utility fees which, unless users specifically opt out, should cover the payers’ out-of-pocket costs.

Instead, Branstetter has found, EMSA has followed a number of apparently deceptive billing practices, including sending bills that list a “due from patient” balance of something like $1,100, even though that amount is actually covered by the utility fee. It also unilaterally implemented a policy making patients responsible for the balance if they don’t provide insurance information within 60 days, while providing lavish benefits to employees and executives.

Branstetter’s latest efforts have been directed toward innovative ways of proving EMSA’s sketchy billing practices, as well as uncovering the details of benefits given to the public utility’s CEO. For a full list of Branstetter’s stories on the subject, databases and documents, as well as a summary of the issues at hand, visit the World‘s excellent landing page for the investigation.

Network drives increase in painkiller prescriptions

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

In the latest installment of his ongoing investigation for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and MedPage Today, John Fauber looks for the source of America’s prescription painkiller boom (graphic), outlining what he describes as “a network of pain organizations, doctors and researchers that pushed for expanded use of the drugs while taking in millions of dollars from the companies that made them.”pills-and-money

Beginning 15 years ago, the network helped create a body of dubious information that can be found in prescribing guidelines, patient literature, position statements, books and doctor education courses, all which favored drugs known as opioid analgesics.

Apparently, that network has been effective. Federal data shows that prescription painkiller sales have quadrupled in the past decade or so, Fauber found, and some of those sales may not have been warranted.

A band of doctors who get little or no money from opioid makers has begun to challenge the hype behind the drugs. They say pharmaceutical industry clout has caused doctors to go overboard in prescribing the drugs, leading to addiction, thousands of overdose deaths each year and other serious complications.

Several of the pain industry’s core beliefs about chronic pain and opioids are not supported by sound research, the Journal Sentinel/MedPage Today investigation found. Among them:

  • The risk of addiction is low in patients with prescriptions.
  • There is no unsafe maximum dose of the drugs.
  • The concept of “pseudoaddiction.”

That concept holds those who display addictive behavior, such as seeking more drugs or higher doses, may not be actual addicts – they are people who need even more opioids to treat their pain.

His investigation dips deep into each of those beliefs and how they helped push painkillers. For a case study, see this companion infographic.