Tag Archives: funding

After transgender reversal, health care providers worry about impact

Susan Heavey

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at determinants@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: lintmachine via Flickr

U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision to rescind federal guidelines to schools on bathroom use for transgender students had been long rumored, and when it was issued last month, some health care groups opposed to the reversal were ready.

“Transgender children are already at increased risk for violence, bullying, harassment and suicide. They may be more prone to depression and engaging in self-harm,” the American Academy of Pediatrics wrote in a statement. Continue reading

The 21st Century Cures Act, health IT and data

Rebecca Vesely

About Rebecca Vesely

Rebecca Vesely is AHCJ's topic leader on health information technology and a freelance writer. She has written about health, science and medicine for AFP, the Bay Area News Group, Modern Healthcare, Wired, Scientific American online and many other news outlets.

GraphicStock

GraphicStock

The 21st Century Cures Act – passed overwhelmingly by Congress in recent days – will have broad implications on health IT and medical technology.

The $6.3 billion bill is probably best known for:

  • Accelerating the path to FDA approval of drugs and medical devices by giving the Food and Drug Administration new authority in this area; Continue reading

A cautionary tale about relying on white papers as research

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

questions-and-moneyWhite papers can be useful tools for journalists. Ideally, they provide authoritative, in-depth information from government or nonprofits about specific policy, diseases, programs, or issues. However, they can also be powerful marketing tools, used by corporations to position a specific product or service as the “solution” to whatever the “problem” is.

Then there is the white paper released by a nonprofit, but developed with corporate financial support. Continue reading

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation supports health journalism training efforts with $450,000 grant

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

SANTA CLARA, Calif. – The Center for Excellence in Health Care Journalism, the educational arm of the Association of Health Care Journalists, has been awarded a three-year grant of $450,000 by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to continue offering training and resources for journalists covering health issues.

RWJF announced the grant this week to coincide with Health Journalism 2015, the annual conference of AHCJ, being held April 24-27 in Silicon Valley. RWJF was one of the first supporters of the association, now marking its 17th year.

The funding will support the association’s annual conference, regional workshops on niche health topics, an annual rural health journalism workshop and the building of health data resources on AHCJ’s website healthjournalism.org. Continue reading

Looking ahead to reporting on aging in the new year

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo by Boris Bartels via Flickr

Photo by Boris Bartels via Flickr

There are plenty of aging-related stories on the horizon for 2015. Here are just some issues and ideas to get you started:

The once-a-decade White House Conference on Aging is scheduled for sometime in mid-2015 – a date is yet to be finalized. It’s the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security. The conference will focus on four key areas:

  • Retirement security
  • Healthy aging
  • Long-term services and supports
  • Elder justice

Look for plenty of updates on the conference by spring.

Retirement

Issues include financial security, affordable housing, aging-in-place and community-based support services. According to Leading Age Magazine, boomers are poorly prepared when it comes to savings. How are the 50- and 60-somethings in your community preparing for retirement? Or are they? Continue reading

Government shutdown doesn’t stop ‘Obamacare’ but may have consequences

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org. Follow her on Facebook.

Photo by Sean Stayte via flickr.

A brief explanation of why a government shutdown over “Obamacare” won’t shutdown “Obamacare:”

Congress is fighting (among other things) over a continuing resolution, better known as a CR. That’s a short-term spending bill to keep the government running because the bitterly divided Congress hasn’t agreed on its normal series of annual spending bills.

But those appropriations bills – wrapped up in the CR – are for “discretionary” spending. “Discretionary” for Congress doesn’t really mean discretionary the way you and I mean discretionary: It’s not “elective” or “optional” or a trip to Italy once the piggy bank is full. It’s a technical term that wraps in a whole lot of what the government does day in and day out.

But it’s not “mandatory” spending – which includes (most of) Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid – and now the subsidies and other key parts of the Affordable Care Act. It’s not that Congress can’t change mandatory spending – it can and it does. But for our purposes here – it’s separate from discretionary spending and the CR. Continue reading