GAO: FDA designation doesn’t ensure safety

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

gras
Ammonium Hydroxide and Phosphoric Acid, both GRAS. Photo by Benny BNut via Flickr.

On his blog Cold Truth (and on AOL News), Andrew Schneider brought our attention to the GAO’s recent investigation into the well-known FDA loophole created by the “generally regarded as safe” or GRAS designation.

The GRAS designation is meant to spare manufacturers lengthy and expensive testing that might otherwise slow the flow of new products to market. It’s conferred, Schneider writes, as long as a “scientific panel selected by the manufacturer can rule that no harm will result from the intended use of an additive.”

Schneider’s version of the highlights of the GAO report:

  • The FDA generally doesn’t know about most of these determinations of “generally regarded as safe,” or GRAS, because companies are not required to inform the agency.
  • The FDA has not taken steps that could help ensure the safety of additives listed as GRAS.
  • Food products may contain numerous ingredients, including GRAS substances, making it difficult, if not impossible, for public health authorities to attribute a food safety problem to a specific GRAS additive.
  • The FDA does not systematically reconsider the safety of GRAS substances as new information or new methods for evaluating safety become available.

The GAO said nanomaterials and imported additives were of particular concern.

(Hat tip to OMB Watch in general and Matthew Madia in particular)

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