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Calendar

Journalism Summit on Infectious Disease: Program

Panels and workshops were created from dozens of ideas from AHCJ members, conference sponsors, outside organizations and nonmember journalists. Final sessions are often a merger of several ideas.

Registered participants will be able to view recordings of the panels on the same day they take place and will have exclusive access to the sessions for the days and weeks following the summit.

All times are Eastern.

Click on red arrows for panel descriptions.

Monday, Nov. 16

10:30 a.m.

Welcome period begins

 

10:50- 11 a.m.

Fall Summit Welcome Message, Day’s Agenda, Intro First Session

  • Andrew Smiley, executive director, Association of Health Care Journalists

  • Ivan Oransky, M.D., editor-in-chief, Spectrum; distinguished writer in residence, New York University, Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute

 

11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Following the pandemic numbers: Data that can bolster reporting

Ever since John Snow pieced together how cholera spread from a water pump in London in 1854, data has been key to learning how epidemics spread and what it will take to finish them off. This panel features experts in biosecurity, vaccines and health disparities. They will explain how different types of data inform the answers to questions in the COVID-19 pandemic, ranging from why some communities are hit harder than others, to how likely a vaccine is to curb the pandemic. Each researcher will highlight a data-driven tool that journalists can use in pandemic reporting.
  • Kevin Barnett, Dr.P.H., M.C.P., director, Center to Advance Community Health and Equity, Public Health Institute

  • Nicole Basta, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, McGill University

  • Jennifer B. Nuzzo, Dr.P.H., S.M., senior scholar, Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security

  • Moderator: Amy Maxmen, Ph.D., reporter, Nature

 

12:30-12:50 p.m.

Breakout rooms with session speakers

This is the attendees’ chance to ask questions and initiate discussions with the session speakers. Each speaker will be in his/her own room and each room will be limited to the first 15 attendees.
  • Kevin Barnett

  • Nicole Basta

  • Jennifer B. Nuzzo

 

12:50-1 p.m.

Break  

1-2:30 p.m.

Different testing types: Access and accuracy

During the pandemic, clinical laboratories have introduced a variety of laboratory test to identify coronavirus patients. During this panel, physicians from the microbiology laboratory at Johns Hopkins will describe the tests they run every day and how accurate these tests are and explain how physicians are using those tests in clinical settings to identify patients who should be hospitalized. In addition, we will discuss how testing is used as a screening tool in underserved areas.
  • Karen C. Carroll, M.D., director, Division of Medical Microbiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

  • Heba Mostafa, M.B.B.Ch., Ph.D., assistant professor of pathology, Johns Hopkins Medicine

  • Kathleen Raquel Page, M.D., associate professor of medicine, Johns Hopkins Medicine

  • Moderator: Joseph Burns, AHCJ topic leader/insurance

 

2:30-2:50 p.m.

Breakout rooms with session speakers

This is the attendees’ chance to ask questions and initiate discussions with the session speakers. Each speaker will be in his/her own room and each room will be limited to the first 15 attendees.
  • Karen C. Carroll

  • Heba Mostafa

  • Kathleen Raquel Page

 

2:50-3 p.m.

End of day with preview of tomorrow's sessions

 

Tuesday, Nov. 17

10:30-10:55 a.m.

Welcome begins

 

10:55 a.m.

Welcome Message, Day’s Agenda, Intro First Session

  • Andrew Smiley, executive director, Association of Health Care Journalists

 

11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

What are we learning from the COVID-19 vaccine efforts?

The race for COVID-19 vaccines won’t be the last vaccine race we'll see. Vaccines for HIV are in the pipeline, scientists continue to work toward the elusive universal flu vaccine, and novel viruses we haven't yet seen are likely in our future. But this race is a sprint compared to the marathon style of past vaccine development. What does that mean for journalists covering development of the Covid-19 vaccine? How does this process differ from past ones, and what lessons and technologies might be applied to future vaccine efforts? How will society react when this and future vaccines become available? These speakers will use their expertise in respiratory virus vaccine development, vaccine decision-making and public response to vaccines to provide insight and ideas for stories you can pursue in coming months of the pandemic and even beyond.
  • Emily K. Brunson, Ph.D., associate professor of anthropology, Texas State University
  • Ruth Karron , M.D., director, Center for Immunization Research; professor of international health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

  • Moderator: Tara Haelle, AHCJ topic leader/medical studies

 

12:30-12:50 p.m.

Breakout rooms with session speakers

This is the attendees’ chance to ask questions and initiate discussions with the session speakers. Each speaker will be in his/her own room and each room will be limited to the first 15 attendees.
  • Emily K. Brunson

  • Ruth Karron
 

12:50-1 p.m.

Break

 

1-2:30 p.m.

Treatment status: What’s here, and what’s on the horizon

As COVID-19 rapidly spread around the world, it left doctors and scientists grasping for treatment options. Hopes for drugs like hydroxychloroquine would soar only to be quickly dashed. Yet doctors and nurses as well as lab-based researchers have been accumulating insights and refining protocols, helping to reduce fatality rates. Experts will share insights into evolving frontline care, promising treatment options, and the challenges of reporting on fast-changing treatments during a pandemic.
  • Amesh Adalja, M.D., senior scholar, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Health Security

  • Neysa Ernst, R.N., M.S.N., nurse manager, Johns Hopkins Biocontainment Unit, Johns Hopkins Hospital

  • Apoorva Mandavilli, science and global health reporter, The New York Times

  • Moderator: Brian Simpson, M.P.H., M.A., editor in chief, Global Health NOW; content and editorial director, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

 

2:30-2:50 p.m.

Breakout rooms with session speakers

This is the attendees’ chance to ask questions and initiate discussions with the session speakers. Each speaker will be in his/her own room and each room will be limited to the first 15 attendees.
  • Amesh Adalja

  • Neysa Ernst

  • Apoorva Mandavilli

 

2:50-3 p.m.

Break

 

3-4:30 p.m.

When two diseases meet: Flu and COVID-19 will share at least one season

A “twindemic” is what infectious disease experts are calling the possibility that both the COVID-19 and influenza viruses will sicken Americans this winter. How likely is that possibility and what are public health officials doing about it? Experts will discuss expectations about the coming flu season, how the health care system will handle the influx of both COVID-19 and flu patients, and how the flu, like COVID-19, disproportionately impacts Black, Latinx and other vulnerable communities. They will also offer insights about what this year’s flu vaccination rates might mean for the anticipated COVID-19 vaccine in 2021.
  • Lisa Maragakis, M.D., M.P.H., senior director of infection prevention, The Johns Hopkins Health System; associate professor of medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

  • Virginia D. Banks, M.D., infectious diseases physician, Northeast Ohio Infectious Disease Associates

  • Litjen “L.J.” Tan, Ph.D., M.S., chief strategy officer, Immunization Action Coalition

  • Moderator: Bara Vaida, AHCJ topic leader/infectious diseases

 

4:30-4:50 p.m.

Breakout room with session speaker

This is the attendees’ chance to ask questions and initiate discussions with the session speakers. Each speaker will be in his/her own room and each room will be limited to the first 15 attendees.
  • Lisa Maragakis

 

4:50-5 p.m.

End of day with preview of tomorrow's sessions

 

Wednesday, Nov. 18

11-11:20 a.m.

Welcome begins  

11:20-11:25 a.m.

Welcome Message, Day’s Agenda

  • Andrew Smiley, executive director, Association of Health Care Journalists

 

11:25-11:30 a.m.

Introduction to spotlight speaker Francis Collins, M.D., Ph.D., director, National Institutes of Health

  • Maryn McKenna, independent journalist

 

11:30 a.m. - noon

A discussion with NIH Director Francis Collins

  • Discussion leader: Maryn McKenna, independent journalist

 

Noon-12:30 p.m.

Deep in details: Q&A with Hilary Marston, M.D., medical officer and policy adviser for preparedness, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Discussion leader: Maryn McKenna, independent journalist

 

12:30-12:45 p.m.

Break  

12:45-1 p.m.

Honoring the 2019 Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism

 

1-1:20 p.m.

Contest winners in breakout rooms for discussions


Meeting Room 1
Trade, Public Health Large and Small


Meeting Room 2
Investigative Large and Small, Student


Meeting Room 3
Beat, Consumer Large and Small


Meeting Room 4
Health Policy Large and Business

  • Alison Young, Curtis B. Hurley chair in public affairs reporting, University of Missouri School of Journalism: Health Policy Large

  • Wendi Thomas, editor and publisher, MLK50: Justice Through Journalism: Business

 

1:20-1:30 p.m.

Break  

1:30-3 p.m.

Efforts in the works to ease a strained health care workforce

The COVID-19 pandemic has placed an incredible strain on our health care system, from hospitals to nursing homes to home care.  The crisis has highlighted issues of staffing shortages, low wages, burnout, and mental distress, as key challenges front line health workers face. As a second wave prompts record case reports, it appears the situation will get worse before it gets better. In this session, three experts weigh in on what’s being done to address these issues and ensure physicians, nurses, aides and others can continue to care for the sickest patients.
  • Karen Swartz, M.D., director of clinical and educational programs, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Mood Disorders Center

  • Cynda Hylton Rushton Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., Anne and George L. Bunting professor of clinical ethics, Berman Institute of Bioethics, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

  • Robert Espinoza, vice president of policy, PHI

  • Moderator: Liz Seegert, AHCJ topic leader/aging

 

3-3:20 p.m.

Breakout rooms with session speakers

This is the attendees’ chance to ask questions and initiate discussions with the session speakers. Each speaker will be in his/her own room and each room will be limited to the first 15 attendees.
  • Karen Swartz

  • Cynda Hylton Rushton

 

3:20-3:30 p.m.

End of day with preview of tomorrow's sessions

 

Thursday, Nov. 19

10:30-10:55 a.m.

Welcome begins  

10:55-11 a.m.

Welcome Message, Day’s Agenda, Intro First Session

  • Andrew Smiley, executive director, Association of Health Care Journalists

 

11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

The hidden side of mental health during a pandemic

Things we all know: The current pandemic can bring on stress, anxiety and fear. Common sense actions, such as social distancing, can make people feel depressed, isolated and lonely. But then there are the more hidden mental health concerns. In some populations, stigmas against seeking care can become more entrenched when people become more remote. As some providers and clients face economic hardship, connecting with professionals can become near impossible. As the pandemic wears on, there’s a threat that the toll on mental health can become greater. Hear from speakers who can help you find stories that can define these problems and solutions.
  • Elizabeth A. Stuart, Ph.D., associate dean for education, Department of Mental Health, Department of Biostatistics, Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; professor, Department of Mental Health, Department of Biostatistics, Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

  • Sarah Vinson, M.D., associate professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and Pediatrics, Morehouse School of Medicine

  • R. Dale Walker, M.D., professor of psychiatry and public health and preventive medicine, Oregon Health and Science University; director, One Sky National Resource Center for American Indian/Alaska Native Substance Abuse Services
  • Moderator: Katti Gray, AHCJ topic leader/behavioral and mental health

 

12:30-12:50 p.m.

Breakout rooms with session speakers

This is the attendees’ chance to ask questions and initiate discussions with the session speakers. Each speaker will be in his/her own room and each room will be limited to the first 15 attendees.
  • Elizabeth A. Stuart

  • R. Dale Walker
 

12:50-1 p.m.

Break  

1-2:30 p.m.

Health disparities among hard-hit populations

Hard-hit populations face health disparities on the daily basis and many times these populations are overlook or forgotten, many are uninsured or underinsure and face language barriers. The current COVID-19 pandemic has made those disparities worse for those populations including people of color - African Americans, Latinos, and other ethnic groups. This panel features experts in disparities in drug outcomes as well as Latino health disparities and how to cover health disparities and hart-hit population for your news outlets.  These experts will explain how important representation of people of color in drug trials is to improve health outcomes across racial and ethnic groups, as well social determinants of health that contribute to health outcome in people of color and how important is for news outlets to not ignore coverage of those hart-hit populations especially during a pandemic. 
  • Carmen Alvarez, Ph.D., R.N., C.R.N.P., C.N.M., F.A.A.N., assistant professor, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

  • Namandje Bumpus, Ph.D., director, Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences; E.K. Marshall and Thomas H. Maren professor of pharmacology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

  • Stephanie Innes, health reporter, The Arizona Republic

  • Moderator: Maria Ortiz-Briones, health reporter, Vida en el Valle

 

2:30-2:50 p.m.

Breakout rooms with session speakers

This is the attendees’ chance to ask questions and initiate discussions with the session speakers. Each speaker will be in his/her own room and each room will be limited to the first 15 attendees.
  • Carmen Alvarez

  • Namandje Bumpus

  • Stephanie Innes
 

2:50-3 p.m.

End of day and thank you for participating!