Tag Archives: lungs

CDC finds ‘chemical of concern’ in vaping-relating illness investigation

Mary Otto

About Mary Otto

Mary Otto, a Washington, D.C.-based freelancer, is AHCJ's topic leader on oral health and the author of "Teeth: The Story of Beauty, Inequality, and the Struggle for Oral Health in America." She can be reached at mary@healthjournalism.org.

Vitamin E acetate, a common additive to dietary supplements and cosmetics, has been identified as a likely culprit in a national outbreak of deaths and serious illnesses traced to vaping.

Researchers tested fluid samples from the lungs of 29 patients with e-cigarette- or vaping-associated lung injury (EVALI) that were submitted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Continue reading

Virginia Beach dentist helps reveal disease cluster among colleagues

Mary Otto

About Mary Otto

Mary Otto, a Washington, D.C.-based freelancer, is AHCJ's topic leader on oral health and the author of "Teeth: The Story of Beauty, Inequality, and the Struggle for Oral Health in America." She can be reached at mary@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: Damien Walmsley via Flickr

In a recent piece for the Virginian-Pilot, reporter Elizabeth Simpson told the story of a local dentist whose hunch about his rare illness helped reveal a troubling disease cluster among fellow dental professionals.

It was four years ago that Virginia Beach dentist Robert Pellerin was diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a mysterious and incurable ailment that scars and hardens the tissues of the lungs. Continue reading

Link between air quality, residents’ lung health seen in European nursing homes

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Isabella Annesi-Maesano

Isabella Annesi-Maesano

Like the United States, most European nations face an increasingly aging population, with more elderly living in some type of long-term care facility or nursing home. A new study in the March 12 online issue of the European Respiratory Journal indicates that indoor air quality in these nursing homes has a serious effect on the lung health of elderly residents.

The research describes the negative effects of poor air quality in nursing homes across several countries. U.S. journalists may want to use this study as background to investigate similar issues at nursing homes in their communities.

Investigators from the EU-funded Geriatric study in Europe on health effects of air quality in nursing homes (GERIE) collected data on five indoor air pollutants: particulate matter known as PM10 (large particles) and PM0.1 (ultra-fine particles), formaldehyde, nitrogen dioxide and ozone. These pollutants come from a range of sources including heaters, building materials, furniture, cleaning products, disinfectants and cooling systems. They studied levels of the pollutants at 50 nursing homes in seven countries: Belgium, Denmark, France, Greece, Italy, Poland and Sweden. Continue reading

Black lung’s back, Obama slow to react?

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

Ken Ward Jr., writing on the Charleston (W.Va.) Gazette‘s Coal Tattoo blog, notes that black lung disease is once again on the rise in Appalachian coal country, and has been steadily climbing since the late ’90s.

coal-shaft

Photo by wallyg via Flickr

Ward notes that a federal appeals court has shut down a miner’s attempt to get it to force tighter coal dust regulations upon the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration, and says the onus is now upon the MSHA to curb the black lung comeback.

According to the administration, it may take until 2011 to write new regulations and Obama’s nominee to lead the MSHA, union veteran Joe Main, has not yet been confirmed by the Senate.