Tag Archives: longevity

Essay collection on longevity revolution sparks story ideas

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: Jundy Tiu via Flickr

Photo: Jundy Tiu via Flickr

What would the future look like if we could all live to 100? How must housing, retirement, health care, technology and other sectors change to meet new demands?

A new collection from the Milken Institute explores possibilities about the future of aging through the lenses of 20 thought leaders in the field. These pundits, with backgrounds in research, finance, education, urban planning, public policy, public health and non-profits, lay out their individual visions of the longevity revolution’s effect on where we live, how we work, how we spend leisure time, who takes care of us and whether we can stave off debilitating conditions through science. Continue reading

Recent headlines examine impact of racial disparities on cancer, longevity

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at determinants@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: MEC Toronto Race Four 5K 10K The Summer Classic 2014 via photopin (license)Recent headlines have taken another look at black women and rising breast cancer rates, worsening health among middle-aged whites, and other race-related health issues.

Photo: MEC Toronto Race Four 5K 10K The Summer Classic 2014 via photopin (license)Recent headlines have taken another look at black women and rising breast cancer rates, worsening health among middle-aged whites, and other race-related health issues.

First there was the “dubious milestone,” as The New York Times called it, of black women for the first time facing an equal rate of breast cancer as white women. Then last week, a headline on the sharp uptick in the death rate among middle-class, white Americans, a finding startling enough to merit front-page treatment in The Washington Post.

It’s no secret that there are racial disparities in cancer rates, longevity and other areas, so why the recent headlines? Continue reading

Emanuel: Stories of longevity may be missing important points

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Ezekiel Emanuel

Ezekiel Emanuel

It’s not that Ezekiel Emanuel, M.D., Ph.D., necessarily wants to die right after he blows out 75 candles on his birthday cake. He just doesn’t want to live to a ripe old age if it means disability, disease or dementia.

Emanuel briefed reporters on the issues of quality versus quantity of life during a Dec. 12 webinar sponsored by Reporting on Health. It was also the theme of his controversial Atlantic article, “Why I Hope to Die at Age 75.”

“You don’t actually pick your own title; I certainly didn’t pick that Atlantic title.” he told more than 200 online participants. “It probably was good for sales for the Atlantic …”

Continue reading

Aging in the new year: A treasure trove of stories for health reporters

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

2014 promises to be a big year in health and aging – with plenty of stories on the horizon for health journalists:

Medicare payments, Alzheimer’s breakthroughs, long-term care financing, caregiving issues, the science of longevity, senior-friendly neighborhoods and technology are just some of the issues journalists will likely report on on during this coming year.

Medicare will see several important changes – the 2014 handbook is a handy reference to have nearby. The standard premium of $104.90 and $147 deductible for  Part B–provider coverage, remains the same for most people; however, some higher-earning seniors may see their Medicare or Medicare Advantage premiums rise slightly or be affected by some taxes like the capital gains tax. Continue reading

Research focuses on improving life as we extend it

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

What happens to quality of life when science actually slows the aging process? That’s what the emerging field of geroscience is all about, according to an interdisciplinary panel of researchers at this year’s Gerontological Society of America Conference. Geroscience tackles biological factors of chronic diseases and aging itself as a risk factor for developing chronic diseases. It has numerous implications for extending healthy life span, enhancing quality of life in later years and impacting public policy surrounding aging and long-term care.

Or, as S. Jay Olshansky, Ph.D., professor at the school of public health at the University of Illinois at Chicago calls it, the Longevity Dividend. “This is a very short way of saying we’re trying to find a way to extend the period of healthy life by going after all the things that go wrong with us as we grow older, which is to go after the biological process of aging itself.” Continue reading

Learn more about ‘longevity gene’ and how genetics influence aging

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Humans have searched for a “fountain of youth” since before the time of Ponce de León. Now scientists may be on track to find a so-called “longevity gene.” SIRT3, part of a class of proteins known as sirtuins, help stem cells cope with stress. A study in mice by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, points to potential for their findings to someday help scientists find targeted treatments for aging-related degenerative diseases. Researchers were able to turn back the molecular clock of older mice when their blood was infused with the proteins – triggering stem cell’s rejuvenating potential similar to that found in younger mice.

Get more resources to understand more about the “longevity gene” and how genetics affects healthy aging with these links in AHCJ’s Aging core topic area.