Tag Archives: LGBT

LGBT youth expert to discuss health issues in webcast

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at determinants@healthjournalism.org.

Lawrence D'Angelo

Lawrence D’Angelo

This week, six national advocacy organizations called for greater efforts to educate LGBT youth about sex, because they say research shows they are at greater risk for dating violence and sexually transmitted infections.

On Monday, AHCJ will discuss such education efforts and related issues with Lawrence D’Angelo, M.D., director of the Youth Pride Clinic at Children’s National Health Systems in Washington, D.C. In a recent interview with us, D’Angelo said he prefers to describes such youths as LGBTQ, since many are still “questioning” their sexual identity. Continue reading

U.S. report tackles issue of conversion therapy for LGBT youth

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at determinants@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: Lesbian Romance via photopin (license)A new report by the Obama Administration presses for an end to so-called “conversion therapy” for young LGBT people.

Photo: Lesbian Romance via photopin (license)A new report by the Obama Administration presses for an end to so-called “conversion therapy” for young LGBT people.

Controversial conversion therapy targeting lesbian and gay young people should be banned, the Obama administration said, releasing a new report criticizing a practice that aims to convert such youth into a “straight” sexual orientation.

“We would support and have supported making it illegal for young people,” Valerie Jarrett, White House senior adviser, said during a press conference call about the report.

Asked whether the practice should also be banned for adults, Jarrett said, “Our focus has really been on banning conversion therapy for youth. Adults, in a sense, make their own decisions about what to do.” Continue reading

Older same-sex couples gain financial protection in SCOTUS decision

About Bob Rosenblatt

Bob Rosenblatt has been a journalist in Washington, D.C., for more than 30 years, with much of his career focused on aging. At the Los Angeles Times, he started the paper’s first beat on aging and launched a popular advice column on Medicare and health insurance.

Photo: Matt Popovich via Flickr

Photo: Matt Popovich via Flickr

In the wake of last month’s Supreme Court ruling on marriage, same-sex married couples in all 50 states should now qualify for financial protection against impoverishment under Medicaid if one of them goes into a nursing home.

Before the high court’s decision, spousal financial protection rules were unavailable to same-sex couples if their state of residence did not recognize their marriage. With a semi-private room in a nursing home costing $80,000 a year, many couples can easily wipe out all their assets without such protection. Continue reading

Could the other SCOTUS ruling improve health for the LGBT community?

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at determinants@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: Matt Popovich via Flickr

Photo: Matt Popovich via Flickr

All eyes were on the U.S. Supreme Court last week as it handed down its highly anticipated decision in King v. Burwell, affirming subsidies in the Affordable Care Act. The justices upheld the financial assistance, saying Congress saw it as critical to a functioning health insurance market. But could the court’s other big ruling have an equally profound impact on another group?

On Friday, the court ruled 5-4 in support of same-sex marriage, saying the Fourteenth Amendment gave such couples the right to marry and legalizing marriage in all 50 U.S. states. While an affirmation of LGBT rights, the decision could also be the first step in improving the health of same-sex couples, according to several health provider organizations that released statements soon after the landmark ruling. Continue reading

Journal’s retraction highlights value of keeping ‘a biostatistician in your back pocket’

About Tara Haelle

Tara Haelle (@TaraHaelle) is AHCJ's medical studies core topic leader, guiding journalists through the jargon-filled shorthand of science and research and enabling them to translate the evidence into accurate information.

Science-retractedA now-retracted study in the journal Science once again reveals how important it is that journalists find appropriate expert sources to weigh in on findings before publishing stories about them.

The well-publicized paper, co-authored by Columbia researcher Donald Green and UCLA graduate student Michael LaCour, suggested that opponents of same-sex marriage were more likely to change their minds after talking with gay and lesbians canvassers. But, as Retraction Watch reported last week, LaCour faked the data. The journal initially posted an “Editorial Expression of Concern” but officially retracted the paper Thursday. Green had specifically requested the retraction, but LaCour does not agree with it. Continue reading

Aging in LGBT community comes with anxiety, silence for some

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

For a generation of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender adults now in their 60s, 70s and 80s, silence was, for a long time, a way of life.

Stu Maddux
Stu Maddux

Growing old and becoming ill and dependent can stir up painful feelings. Am I a worthwhile person? Will others stay by me or abandon me if I show them who I really am? Can I trust that I won’t be judged? Will I be treated well if I display my vulnerability, or do I have to put up my guard?

Filmmaker Stu Maddux, a former television journalist, anchor and producer, takes us inside this world in Gen Silent, a film that profiles six LGBT seniors and the issues they’re facing as they age. Maddux recently spoke at length with AHCJ topic leader Judith Graham about making this film and we share highlights of that conversation.