Tag Archives: kidneys

Disparities found in hospice care among older dialysis patients

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: David Mulder via Flickr

Photo: David Mulder via Flickr

While end-of-life planning may be more common by providers and patients, there are “substantial” racial disparities when it comes to hospice use among some older adults, according to a new study. Researchers found that end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who were African American or Native American were 44 percent less likely to take use hospice care than white patients. Asian-Americans were 43 percent less likely to do so. Continue reading

ProPublica releases ratings of 5,000 dialysis providers

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

On the heels of a successful FOIA request related to Robin Fields’ dialysis investigation, ProPublica has published a database evaluating dialysis clinics on 15 different measures. The information has been available to state health agencies for years, but this is the first time it’s been released for general public consumption, Fields writes.

Patients have long chosen dialysis clinics based only on location or physician recommendation, even though the data shows a wide variation in quality among the 5,000-plus such facilities nationwide.

In more than 200 counties nationwide, the data show, the gap between facilities with the best and worst patient survival, adjusted for case-mix differences, is greater than 50 percent. In areas such as Allegheny County, Pa., or Franklin County, Ohio, each with upwards of two dozen clinics, the differences are even more substantial, exceeding 200 percent.
There is also wide variability in how often patients at different clinics are hospitalized for septicemia. Although septicemia cases can be unrelated to dialysis, it is a significant risk for patients, who typically have their blood cleaned of toxins three times a week. Nationally, the rate was about 12 percent a year for 2006 to 2008. But in dozens of counties, the spread between facilities with the highest and lowest rates was more than 25 percentage points.

Like Dollars for Docs, this new database should provide plenty of ready localizations of of the story.

Addressing the growing demand for kidneys

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Josephine Marcotty of the Minneapolis Star Tribune recently wrote a series addressing the increasing demand for kidneys, a need spurred by an aging population, increases in diabetes, obesity and high-blood pressure. KidneyShe found that it is a public health crisis that costs the nation $33.6 billion a year, and there is no end in sight.

Marcotty covered one woman’s search for a kidney, the ethics of paired donations and how the medical center decided who would get organs.

In this article for AHCJ members, she shares what she learned about kidney donation and how she reported the story.

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