Tag Archives: cms

OIG report: CMS not doing enough for vulnerable nursing home residents

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: Matthew Paulson via FlickrDespite hurricane risks, Florida has been a popular retirement locale for senior citizens, who may eventually need to transition to skilled nursing facilities.

News on Wednesday that eight residents of a Hollywood, Fla. nursing home had died a few days after the facility lost power for its air conditioning unit during Hurricane Irma (see more coverage links below) has refocused attention on persistent weaknesses in nursing facility regulation and oversight.

A report released in late August (prior to the Harvey and Irma hurricanes) by the Department of Health and Human Services Inspector General (OIG) highlights problems with how incidents of potential abuse or neglect are reported and investigated. Separately, there has been pushback in Congress on a Trump administration effort to weaken Obama-era restrictions on the use of arbitration agreements to settle nursing home claims. Continue reading

CMS moves into the future, and looks back

Rebecca Vesely

About Rebecca Vesely

Rebecca Vesely is AHCJ's topic leader on health information technology and a freelance writer. She has written about health IT since the late 1990s for a variety of publications.

Andy Slavitt

Andy Slavitt

As we cover leadership changes at the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), it is worth reflecting on the advancements at the federal agency in recent years – especially its increased focus on health information technology.

The CMS oversees the Medicare and Medicaid programs, but its duties expanded over the past decade to include greater access to health information online, and to spurring technology innovation in the health sector.

Technology was a focus of outgoing Acting Administrator Andy Slavitt’s prepared final remarks to the CMS staff, delivered Thursday morning. Continue reading

Journalist finds state budget cuts adversely affected patient care

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Anyone who has started a new reporting job knows the feeling: You want to find some story somewhere on your beat that you can crank out to show you know how to deliver good copy on time.

It’s unlikely that you’re thinking you’ll uncover a big story that turns into a five-part series. But that’s what happened to Megan Hart, a reporter covering health care for KHI News Service in Topeka, Kan. Continue reading

New tip sheet helps reporters shape Medicare coverage

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Philip Moeller

Philip Moeller

Why are the nuances of Medicare benefits so complicated? While journalists may never find the answer to this question, they can be more aware of this challenge as they shape their reporting.

Medicare’s arcane and overlapping regulations mean consumers often lose or are penalized for benefits for which they are entitled, according to journalist Philip Moeller, who writes about aging and related issues for PBS NewsHour and Money. Continue reading

Watch for potential pitfalls as CMS tests a new bundled payment program for cardiac care

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: Penn State via Flickr

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services just announced a five-year test, to begin next summer, of a new way to pay for the care of patients who have had a heart attack or need coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

As with any new payment model, unintended consequences are possible. The experimental bundled-payment program, which was announced July 25 and will begin July 1, 2017, potential could lead some physicians to sell their practices to hospitals, be financially risky and potentially harmful to the hospitals forced to participate, and could lead to an increase in heart attacks, warned Francois de Brantes, executive director of the consulting firm Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute and an expert on bundled payment models. Continue reading