Tag Archives: budgets

Report on these unintended health consequences of municipal budget cuts

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: emilydickinsonridesabmx via Flikr

Photo: emilydickinsonridesabmx via Flikr

Much of the local news over the Independence Day weekend focused such as fireworks safety, beach traffic, flags and parades. But a brief article by Samuel Johnson, the public information officer of the Baltimore Fire Department, caught my attention — and had nothing to do with the holiday.

Many budget-crunched municipalities have been forced to cut back on essential services, such as police and fire personnel. Some firehouses have even closed. That increases the risk for everyone who lives near one — especially older adults and particularly in the summer months. Continue reading

Stories to be found in local poison control centers

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Poison control centers narrowly escaped losing almost all federal funding this year and their appropriations are down, despite evidence that they keep people out of emergency rooms, writes Maryn McKenna, an independent journalist and AHCJ board member.

poison

Photo by ˙Cаvin 〄 via Flickr

McKenna cites statistics showing that, when poison control centers’ budgets are cut, hospital visits to treat poisonings increase. “In 2004, the Institute of Medicine estimated that every dollar of public funding spent on a poison control center saves $10 that would otherwise have been spent on health care.”

The piece, in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, is packed with facts about the 57 centers in the United States, including:

  • Poisoning is the second most common cause of injury deaths in the United States
  • About 15 percent of calls to poison control centers come from emergency departments, hospitals, and office practices.
  • Poison centers increasingly are providing advice for emergency personnel encountering toxicities from prescription drug abuse.

McKenna spoke to a Harvard professor of pediatrics who called budget cuts to poison control centers “the definition of ‘penny-wise, pound-foolish.’”

What’s happening at the poison control center in your area? Is it experiencing budgetary woes? How are staff coping with that? How is that affecting the community and area hospitals?

The American Association of Poison Control Centers has a directory online to help you contact your local center.