Tag Archives: Apple

Apple Watch Series 4 unveiling draws thoughtful coverage

Rebecca Vesely

About Rebecca Vesely

Rebecca Vesely is AHCJ's topic leader on health information technology and a freelance writer. She has written about health, science and medicine for AFP, the Bay Area News Group, Modern Healthcare, Wired, Scientific American online and many other news outlets.

Health reporters provided rich context – and a dose of skepticism – around Apple’s introduction of the Apple Watch Series 4, which included an electrocardiogram (ECG) app and fall detection capabilities.

In case you missed it, the big news was that Apple received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for its electrical heart rate sensor that can take an ECG using a new enabled app. The app can detect signs of atrial fibrillation (AFib), an irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke, blood clots and other heart complications. Continue reading

Neurosurgery conference ditches paper for iPods

Andrew Van Dam

About Andrew Van Dam

Andrew Van Dam of The Wall Street Journal previously worked at the AHCJ offices while earning his master’s degree at the Missouri School of Journalism.

The Philadelphia Inquirer‘s Stacey Burling reports that neurosurgeons will be skipping the paper for their next meeting, relying instead on iPod Touches pre-loaded with conference materials.

touchReading on the iPod Touch. Photo by Ben Kraal via Flickr

It will be only the second conference to have done so (a group of Canadian filmmakers was the first). Registration fees were hiked by $100 to cover the cost of the devices, and local Apple staff will be on hand to answer questions. Burling describes the process:

When they register at the American Association of Neurological Surgeons meeting, the doctors will be given iPod touches already loaded with everything they’ll need, including the program (165 pages last year), summaries of research presented at the meeting, advertising and information from exhibitors. Doctors will be able to use the iPods for messaging and for interacting with presenters during meetings. The convention also attracts 3,500 exhibitors and guests who will not be given the devices.

Memphis hospital confirms liver transplant for Jobs

Scott Hensley

About Scott Hensley

Scott Hensley runs NPR's online health channel, Shots. Previously he was the founding editor of The Wall Street Journal's Health Blog and covered the drug industry and the Human Genome Project for the Journal. Hensley serves on AHCJ's board of directors. You can follow him at @ScottHensley.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs still isn’t talking about his health. But a Tennessee hospital confirmed a Wall Street Journal scoop over the weekend that said the secretive exec had a liver transplant.

steve-jobs

Steve Jobs appeared at the 2008 MacWorld Conference and Expo. (Photo: Matthew Yohe via Wikimedia)

Jobs has been ill and took a leave from the company early this year. But his statements, and those of the company, have been vague – at best. The front-page Journal story saying he’d had a liver transplant was nearly as vague, lacking attribution for the claim.

Well, Methodist Hospital of Memphis, with Jobs’ permission, has ended the speculation on the veracity of the transplant report. In a statement, the hospital said he got a new liver because he was “the sickest patient on the waiting list at the time a donor organ became available.” Tennessee has shorter waiting times than most states.

Jobs’ outlook is good, the hospital said. Wonder what Apple and Jobs have to say on that score?

It’s especially curious that Methodist, operating under patient privacy rules, was more inclined to get the news out than Apple, a publicly traded company obligated by securities regulations to disclose material information.

There’s plenty of wiggle room in those regs. Still, as Columbia University law prof John Coffee tells Business Week, “Apple is probably an extreme example where the CEO’s health is very material. Walt Disney in 1950 would have been an equivalent.”

Update: A Reuters reporter spotted Jobs at the Apple campus on Monday, adding to speculation that the CEO may have returned to work.

Earlier: Jobs’ letter too vague for meaningful reporting