Despite ‘repeal and replace’ vow, Republicans pull health care bill before vote

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Paul Ryan

Obamacare is the law of the land. … We’re going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future.” – Paul Ryan

That was the speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives after pulling the GOP health care bill from consideration because it was clear there weren’t enough votes to pass it.

The Associated Press sums up the range of emotion after the decision was announced: After health care bill’s withdrawal, elation and anger. It also points out the “winners, losers and a few in between.”
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Health care repeal bill would have dealt death blow to ‘essential health benefits’

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org.

A variety of fixes aimed at appeasing resistant conservative House members failed to save the GOP’s Affordable Care Act repeal bill, which was pulled from consideration late Friday.

Among last-minute changes to the GOP’s proposed American Health Care Act (ACHA) was language that would have repealed 10 so-called “essential health benefits” in the individual market, letting states decided which mandates they wanted. Continue reading

Policy experts predicted AHCA’s potential impact on older adults

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in Kaiser Health News, The Atlantic.com, New America Media, AARP.com and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College in New York City, and co-produces HealthStyles for WBAI-FM/Pacifica Radio.

Photo: Andy De via Flickr

From higher age-based premiums to cuts in Medicaid funding for dual eligibles, there was much for aging advocates to criticize about the Republicans’ now-failed attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Policy experts from several aging advocacy organizations briefed reporters during a March 23 conference call on the proposed American Health Care Act (ACHA). The next day, GOP leadership and the White House decided to pull the amended bill from consideration due to lack of support in the House of Representatives.

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Some help with the challenges of tracking down lead data

Susan Heavey

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at determinants@healthjournalism.org.

Lead contamination continues to make headlines more than a year after the Flint municipal lead crisis in Michigan hit the national news. The public outcry over the government’s response to dealing with the Detroit suburb’s lead-contaminated water spurred reporters across the country to revisit lead issues for their audiences.

The problem goes beyond lead-tainted pipes that were contamination source in Flint. Continue reading

Study: Newspaper coverage rarely reflects medical evidence over time

Tara Haelle

About Tara Haelle

Tara Haelle (@TaraHaelle) is AHCJ's medical studies core topic leader, guiding journalists through the jargon-filled shorthand of science and research and enabling them to translate the evidence into accurate information.

Photo: Binuri Ranasinghe via Flickr

Journalists are in love with reporting new findings about a disease and a particular risk factor, but they are not so keen on following what happens later and reporting on whether the finding was replicated – and just over half the time is later disproved.

This comes from a recent study in PLOS ONE by authors who previously found that journalists tend to favor initial findings over subsequent findings on the same outcome. Continue reading