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AHCJ will hold a series of webcasts about aspects of patient safety that will be archived on this page. Webcasts and podcasts from other sources will be included as well.

AHCJ webcasts

Author exposes rampant fraud in the generic drug industry

June 2019
Investigative journalist Katherine Eban explains how health care journalists can cover the fraud she uncovered in the generic drug business for her new book, "Bottle of Lies: The Inside Story of the Generic Drug Boom." Her work reveals how rampant fraud among generic drug manufacturers and lax FDA oversight put patients' health at risk. In the United States, 90% of spending for all pharmaceuticals goes for generic drugs because health insurers limit choice by steering patients to these medications, which are cheaper than brand-name drugs.

Other webcasts and podcasts

Reducing Harm by Getting Patients the Right Diagnosis at the Right Time
Diagnostic errors are the most common, catastrophic and costly of all medical errors—resulting in thousands of patients suffering serious harm every year.
Watch this SIDM-sponsored Modern Healthcare webinar to learn how to understand diagnostic error, when and where misdiagnoses are most likely to take place, how to track areas for improvement in diagnostic quality, and best practices that systems can employ to improve the diagnostic process.

The Patient and the Anesthesiologist
Linda Kenney went into the hospital for an ankle replacement. She came out with a host of complications resulting from a mistake that no one was willing to admit. Until Rick van Pelt, M.D., her anesthesiologist, stepped forward. In this three-part video case study, you’ll find out what happened in the immediate aftermath of the surgery, watch Kenney and van Pelt describe their first meeting after the surgery, and watch Kathy Duncan, R.N., and Don Berwick, M.D., analyze the case.

Why Is Reducing Harm — Not Just Error — Important to Patient Safety?
Everyone makes mistakes. So how can health care prevent errors from harming patients? In this video, Dr. David W. Bates, Chief Innovation Officer at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains why health care is now working to improve patient safety by reducing harm, not just error. Dr. Bates also offers his thoughts on one definition of harm that was used in the Harvard Medical Practice Study, one of the seminal research projects on the epidemiology of medication error.

"To Err is Human:"A Patient Safety Documentary
This is an in-depth documentary about the silent epidemic of medical mistakes and those working quietly behind the scenes to create a new age of patient safety. Through interviews with leaders in healthcare, footage of real-world efforts leading to safer care, and one family’s compelling journey from victim to empowerment, the film provides a unique look at our healthcare system’s ongoing fight against preventable harm.

Improving Diagnosis in Health Care: An Implementation Workshop
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a public implementation workshop for the 2015 report, Improving Diagnosis in Health Care, on July 17, 2017.

Treatment overkill
Watch @LizSzabo and an expert panel discuss her #TreatmentOverkill series and the $210-billion problem of unnecessary care.

In Conversation With… Gordon Schiff, M.D.
Schiff is associate director of Brigham and Women's Center for Patient Safety Research and Practice, associate professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and quality and safety director for the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care. He was an invited expert and reviewer for the Improving Diagnosis in Health Care report of the National Academy of Medicine. Robert M. Wachter, M.D., professor and chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco,  spoke with him about his work and experience with understanding and preventing diagnostic errors.

The Dangers of a Digital Diagnosis
Renowned UCSF internist, author and patient advocate Bob Wachter shares his struggle to balance patient empowerment with patient safety in the digital age.