Tag Archives: infections

Hospitals to start reporting infection data Jan. 1

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Hospitals are set to begin reporting information about hospital-acquired bloodstream infections to the federal government on Jan. 1, with the data becoming available to the public later in the year through the Hospital Compare website, according to an article by Tony Pugh of McClatchy Newspapers. Pugh also reports that hospitals will start reporting on surgical site infections in 2012.

The article includes a graphic that shows what states currently require public reporting of hospital-acquired infections.

While reporting to Hospital Compare will be voluntary, hospitals that fail to comply will “lose 2 percent of their Medicare funding beginning in fiscal year 2013.”

There are nearly 250,000 catheter-related bloodstream infections a year in U.S. hospitals, contributing to roughly 31,000 patient deaths annually. There are more than 290,000 surgical site infections a year, contributing to more than 8,200 deaths.

(Hat tip to FairWarning.org)

Reminder: AHCJ has compiled easy-to-use Excel spreadsheets of much of the data currently available from Hospital Compare. The up-to-date files, available to AHCJ members, are designed to allow you to compare more than three hospitals at a time – unlike the Hospital Compare look-up tool – using spreadsheet or database software to filter, sort and use other analysis tools with precision. You can look at hospital mortality and readmission data, as well as patient satisfaction.

AHCJ will be looking at making the new infection data available to members similar to what it offers for the mortality, readmission and patient satisfaction data.

AHCJ also has tip sheets to help you understand and analyze the data:

Analysis of billing record data reveals hospital quality issues in Las Vegas

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Using data from hospital billing records, Marshall Allen and Alex Richards of the Las Vegas Sun have been able to identify “hospital-acquired patient harm,” that is, events in which patients are harmed while in the hospital.

Medicare does not pay for these “never events” and so they are reflected in hospital billing codes. Such events include things like leaving foreign objects in a patient, bed sores, falls, infections related to catheters or surgical sites, blood clots and poor glycemic control.

Nevada – and 40 other states – collect such data for analysis, Allen and Richards report. In Nevada, the state had not yet analyzed the data so the reporters requested it and did the analysis.

The pair requested and received records for “every Nevada hospital inpatient visit going back a decade — 2.9 million in all. The information, coupled with interviews with more than 150 patients and health care insiders, has yielded a sweeping and detailed portrait of hospital care in Las Vegas.”

The project includes stories about patients who were harmed while hospitalized, the documents behind the reporting, data tables, interactive graphics and more.

CDC report includes state data on infections

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

The CDC has released a report detailing health-care-associated infections, specifically central line-associated bloodstream infections.

This is the first such report to include any state-specific information, according to the CDC, though it only includes states that require reporting of CLABSIs to the National Healthcare Safety Network. The CDC expects this to serve as a baseline report to help guide prevention plans and activities.

Peter Pronovost, M.D., who spoke about patient safety and health care associated infections at Health Journalism 2010, was among the participants in a telebriefing about the report. A transcript of that briefing should be available later today.