Tag Archives: AHCJ-CDC Health Journalism Fellowships

Expect developments in screening, treatment for hepatitis C

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

This is a guest post from Felice J. Freyer, a medical writer at The Providence (R.I.) Journal. Freyer, an AHCJ board member, is one of 11 AHCJ-CDC Health Journalism Fellows visiting the CDC this week.

Felice J. Freyer

Felice J. Freyer

One in 30 people born between 1945 and 1965 – the Baby Boom generation – suffer from hepatitis C, a viral infection that can lead to liver cancer.

But the majority of infected people don’t know they have it.

That may change soon, and journalists should keep their ears perked for developments that will lead to good stories about hepatitis, Dr. John Ward, director of the Viral Hepatitis Program at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told the AHCJ-CDC Health Journalism Fellows this morning.

The CDC is in the process of developing screening guidelines in the hope of encouraging more people to get tested for hepatitis C. Current guidelines call for asking people about risk factors, such as intravenous drug use, that many may not want to disclose or consider part of their distant past, Ward said. The new guidelines may be based on age and other factors rather than just behaviors, he said.

Additionally, the FDA is considering approval of a new, more effective drug against hepatitis C. “We are on the cusp of a revolution in hepatitis C treatment,” Ward said.

The 11 AHCJ-CDC fellows today completed the third of four days at the CDC, where they have met with CDC experts on food-borne illness, diabetes, influenza, health care-acquired infections and other topics, as well as touring the CDC emergency operations center and laboratories in Atlanta.

Other dispatches from the AHCJ-CDC Health Journalism Fellows:

11 chosen as 2010-11 AHCJ-CDC Health Journalism Fellows

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

The Association of Health Care Journalists has announced the selection of the third class of AHCJ-CDC Health Journalism Fellows. The 11 journalists will spend a week studying a variety of public health issues at two Atlanta campuses of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.AHCJ-CDC Health Journalism Fellowships logo

The fellowship program will include presentations, roundtable discussions and lab tours on epidemiology, global disease prevention efforts, obesity, vaccine safety, pandemic flu preparedness, autism and many other topics.

The 2010-11 AHCJ-CDC fellows are:

  • Ruby de Luna, KUOW-Seattle Public Radio
  • Felice Freyer, The Providence Journal
  • Raymond Hainer, Health.com / Time Inc.
  • Katherine Harmon, Scientific American
  • Margaret Haskell, Bangor Daily News
  • Jori Lewis, freelance journalist & radio producer
  • Rong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
  • Meredith Matthews, Current Health Teens magazine/Weekly Reader
  • Kevin McCarthy, Consumer Reports/Consumers Union
  • Lara Salahi, ABC News
  • Miranda Van Gelder, Martha Stewart Living

Fellows will tour the CDC director’s National Emergency Operations Center, meet sources on policy and research and learn how to tap the agency’s abundant resources to produce better stories. The training will take place in December at CDC’s Atlanta and Chamblee campuses.

The CDC is charged with protecting public health and safety by preventing and controlling diseases and injuries; enhancing health decisions by providing credible information on critical health issues; and promoting healthy living through strong partnerships with local, national and international organizations.

AHCJ is a nonprofit membership organization of more than 1,000 journalists interested in health and health care. It conducts training and creates other educational materials through its Center for Excellence in Health Care Journalism. AHCJ is housed at the Missouri School of Journalism.

10 selected for 2009-10 AHCJ-CDC fellowships

About Len Bruzzese

Len Bruzzese is the executive director of AHCJ and its Center for Excellence in Health Care Journalism. He also is an associate professor at the Missouri School of Journalism and served for nearly 20 years in daily journalism.

The Association of Health Care Journalists has announced the selection of the second class of AHCJ-CDC Health Journalism Fellows. The 10 journalists will spend a week studying a variety of public health issues at two Atlanta campuses of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.AHCJ-CDC Health Journalism Fellowships logo

The fellowship program will include presentations, roundtable discussions and lab tours on epidemiology, global disease prevention efforts, obesity, vaccine safety, pandemic flu preparedness, autism and many other topics.

The 2009-2010 AHCJ-CDC fellows are:

  • Corey Binns, freelance, New York
  • Kate Dailey, Newsweek, New York
  • Vicky Eckenrode, StarNews, Wilmington, N.C.
  • Carin Gorrell, Self magazine, New York
  • Elaine Appleton Grant, New Hampshire Public Radio, Concord, N.H.
  • Daniel Keller, freelance, Glenside, Pa.
  • James T. Mulder, The Post-Standard, Syracuse, N.Y.
  • Ginger Rough, The Arizona Republic, Phoenix
  • Rebecca Ruiz, Forbes, New York
  • Mary Shedden, The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Fla.

Fellows will tour the CDC director’s National Emergency Operations Center, meet sources on policy and research and learn how to tap the agency’s abundant resources to produce better stories. The training will take place in December at CDC’s Atlanta and Chamblee campuses.

The CDC is charged with protecting public health and safety by preventing and controlling diseases and injuries; enhancing health decisions by providing credible information on critical health issues; and promoting healthy living through strong partnerships with local, national and international organizations.

AHCJ is a nonprofit membership organization of more than 1,100 journalists interested in health and health care. It conducts training and creates other educational materials through its Center for Excellence in Health Care Journalism. AHCJ is housed at the Missouri School of Journalism.