Category Archives: Covering medical studies

Increased optimism about new Alzheimer’s drugs, tests

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: AJ Cann via Flickr

You may have recently heard about the multimillion-dollar donation that Bill Gates and Leonard Lauder made to support research into biomarkers for early detection of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

The Diagnostics Accelerator initiative is part of the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation’s (ADDF) effort to speed diagnosis and develop drugs that can prevent, treat, and cure the disease. Lauder was an ADDF co-founder. Continue reading

Checking conflicts of interest: If cutting corners, at least do it right

Tara Haelle

About Tara Haelle

Tara Haelle (@TaraHaelle) is AHCJ's medical studies core topic leader, guiding journalists through the jargon-filled shorthand of science and research and enabling them to translate the evidence into accurate information.

Photo: Hey Paul Studios via Flickr

Sometimes you have to learn things the hard way to get them right the next time – even when you already know better and shouldn’t have made that rookie mistake in the first place.

That’s what this post is about: My haste in covering a story I already know a lot about led me to omit a crucial piece of reporting – checking for potential conflicts of interest. I hope others will learn from my experience and use the resources I provide below to avoid the same mistake. Continue reading

Good health reporters know how to size up medical evidence

Cynthia Craft

About Cynthia Craft

Cynthia Craft (@cynthiahcraft) is the director of engagement for AHCJ, joining the organization after an extensive career in daily journalism, including a decade on the health care beat. Craft most recently worked as a senior writer at The Sacramento Bee, having also worked for the Los Angeles Times, Dallas Times Herald and the California Journal.

Care to know more about what it takes to accurately weigh medical evidence? You’ve got just a couple of days to jump in to apply for AHCJ’s Comparative Effectiveness Research Fellowship – the deadline is Friday.

To get an idea of what you’ll walk away with by joining the select group of health journalists headed to Bethesda, Md., Oct. 7-11, read what former CER fellows said: Continue reading

Save the date: Baltimore to host Health Journalism 2019

Len Bruzzese

About Len Bruzzese

Len Bruzzese is the executive director of AHCJ and its Center for Excellence in Health Care Journalism. He also is an associate professor at the Missouri School of Journalism and served for nearly 20 years in daily journalism.

The Association of Health Care Journalists will convene in Baltimore for Health Journalism 2019.

The organization’s annual conference is slated for May 2-5, 2019, at the Hilton Baltimore. Serving as the local host team this year will be Johns Hopkins University, including its Bloomberg School of Public Health and School of Nursing, and Johns Hopkins Medicine.

The conference, which usually draws 700-800 attendees, will feature three and a half days of workshops, panels, roundtables and field trips covering the latest topics in medical science, health policy, public health, medical education, consumer health and the business of health care. Continue reading

Study looks at media coverage of water fluoridation efforts

Mary Otto

About Mary Otto

Mary Otto, a Washington, D.C.-based freelancer, is AHCJ's topic leader on oral health and the author of "Teeth: The Story of Beauty, Inequality, and the Struggle for Oral Health in America." She can be reached at mary@healthjournalism.org.

Photo” Christopher Irwin via Flickr

Last fall, oral health advocates joined a successful push to save a city water fluoridation ordinance in Rugby, N.D.

Meanwhile, in Buda, Texas, voters rejected a measure that would have reinstated water fluoridation in their Austin suburb. Continue reading