Category Archives: Covering medical studies

How I Did It: Marilynn Marchione concludes an impressive career in medical writing

About Tara Haelle

Tara Haelle (@TaraHaelle) is AHCJ's medical studies core topic leader, guiding journalists through the jargon-filled shorthand of science and research and enabling them to translate the evidence into accurate information.

Marilynn Marchione

Marilynn Marchione was the Associated Press’s chief medical writer for the last 10 years of her long career in journalism.

Deciding to retire this year was not easy because she loved her job and rarely woke up thinking, “How long till I don’t have to do this anymore?” The pandemic delayed her plans for more than a year because she didn’t want to miss the chance to report an important story and because it didn’t feel right to leave the job at a time of such enormous need.

Marchione took time out of her busy schedule recently — between relaxing on the beach and reading a good book — to share what she learned over her long career of covering medical research. From emphasizing the substantial responsibility of health journalists to get their reporting right, to discussing what she’s learned from her mistakes, to highlighting what chops are needed to report on medical research well, her wisdom is like a 10-minute master class on what it takes to be an accurate, thoughtful, responsible, and incisive medical reporter. Continue reading

Science center’s principles offer guidance to reporters covering complicated COVID-19 issues

About Tara Haelle

Tara Haelle (@TaraHaelle) is AHCJ's medical studies core topic leader, guiding journalists through the jargon-filled shorthand of science and research and enabling them to translate the evidence into accurate information.

Infographic from Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School. Click to enlarge.

While most AHCJ members have been writing about health for a while, the COVID-19 pandemic suddenly turned nearly every other reporter in the country into a health reporter, at least for a time. Even those who don’t directly report on the pandemic likely cannot report on their regular beat without the pandemic affecting it in some way or another.

Those who have been able to stick to the beats they know best, such as business, entertainment, or sports, have not needed to worry as much about quickly boning up on science for the first time since high school or college. But many other reporters, particularly general assignment reporters, have found themselves reporting on vaccines, epidemiology, infectious disease, health disparities, health policy, vaccine hesitancy, and a host of related topics for which they lack specialized training or experience. Sometimes, that has been a big problem. At times, they’ve gotten the science wrong, inadvertently mischaracterized a concept, or unwittingly conveyed or emphasized the wrong message. Continue reading

Wednesday NIH webinar on women and alcohol highlights obscured problem

About Tara Haelle

Tara Haelle (@TaraHaelle) is AHCJ's medical studies core topic leader, guiding journalists through the jargon-filled shorthand of science and research and enabling them to translate the evidence into accurate information.

While recent headlines have pointed out the disastrous rise in opioid use during the pandemic, less attention has focused on alcohol consumption during the pandemic and relapses among those with alcohol use disorder. Even more under-recognized is the prevalence and burden of alcohol use disorder among women, who too often aren’t included in discussions about the condition.

Yet research from the National Institutes of Health shows that the gender gap between men’s and women’s alcohol consumption is narrowing — and that’s not a good thing. Higher levels of alcohol consumption had already been on the rise in older adults and particularly in women prior to 2020, and the pandemic has only exacerbated this health issue. Continue reading

Another Alzheimer’s treatment takes a different route than the rest

About Liz Seegert and Tara Haelle

Liz Seegert (@lseegert) is AHCJ’s topic leader on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today and other outlets. Tara Haelle (@TaraHaelle) is medical studies core topic leader, helping journalists translate evidence into accurate information.

Photo: Isaac Mao via Flickr

Photo: Isaac Mao via Flickr

Editor’s Note: This is part 2 of a two-part package on the pipeline for Alzheimer’s disease drugs. Check out part 1.

While the controversy surrounding the FDA’s approval of Biogen’s adumanucab for Alzheimer’s disease continues, several other drug companies are developing their own therapies to prevent or slow the progression of the disease.

One of those new drugs, ALZ-801, began National Institute of Aging-funded Phase 3 trials on June 4. Unlike aducanumab or other drug candidates from Eisai, Eli Lilly and Roche, which attack amyloid plaque after it forms in the brain, biotech startup Alzheon, Inc. aims to help people with AD who have two copies of the ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE4/4), a known risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. The goal is to prevent plaque from forming in the first place or prevent additional plaque from forming in those who already show clinical symptoms of Alzheimer’s. ALZ-801 is also the only drug currently under investigation administered orally and which uses precision medicine strategy (factoring in individual genetics and lifestyle), according to the company. Continue reading

Aside from Eli Lilly’s drug, what else is in the Alzheimer’s pipeline?

About Liz Seegert and Tara Haelle

Liz Seegert (@lseegert) is AHCJ’s topic leader on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today and other outlets. Tara Haelle (@TaraHaelle) is medical studies core topic leader, helping journalists translate evidence into accurate information.

Photo: Kenny Stoltz via Flickr

Photo: Kenny Stoltz via Flickr

Eli Lilly recently announced that the FDA had granted a breakthrough therapy designation for donanemab, its investigational antibody therapy for Alzheimer’s disease. The designation means the FDA will expedite the drug’s development and review because it treats a serious condition, and early evidence has shown enough improvement on key clinical measures compared to other drugs on the market. This should mean it has a good chance of being effective in treating the condition.

Donanemab, also called N3pG, is an investigational antibody that targets a modified form of beta-amyloid, aiming to clear out plaques that have built up in the brain. Lilly’s Phase 2 trial, TRAILBLAZER-ALZ, studied the efficacy and safety of donanemab in patients with early, symptomatic Alzheimer’s. The results, which appeared in the May 6 New England Journal of Medicine, concluded that “donanemab resulted in a better composite score for cognition and for the ability to perform activities of daily living than placebo at 76 weeks, although results for secondary outcomes were mixed.” Continue reading