Category Archives: Aging

What the new tax bill may mean for older adults

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: Neil Moralee via Flickr

What does the just-passed Republican tax bill mean for most older adults? It’s mostly bad news, advocates say. Many provisions are likely to lead to more out of pocket costs, an especially serious problem for those on fixed incomes.

Worse, according to a coalition of more than 50 advocacy groups, the new law now jeopardizes Medicare, Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. It also puts at serious risk for future funding cuts a variety of home and community programs that enable older adults to age in place, as well as discretionary programs such as Meals on Wheels. Continue reading

A look at what’s behind latest Alzheimer’s projections

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: Ann via Flickr

The population of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease is projected to more than double by 2060, according to a new study by UCLA researchers. By 2060, an estimated 15 million people in the United States will have Alzheimer’s, dementia or mild cognitive impairment, up from about 6.08 million this year. The researchers used computer models to analyze data from the largest studies available on rates of Alzheimer’s progression to estimate the number of people in preclinical and clinical disease states. Continue reading

Missouri journalist gives tips on writing about patient-centered medical homes

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: Ann Fisher via Flickr

The Advisory Board recently asked this question: Are patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) living up to the hype? As Tomi Ogundimu and Abby Burns wrote, the concept’s popularity has increased since passage of the Affordable Care Act and a shift to value-based payment for health care providers.

Ogundimu and Burns referenced a recent report from the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative, which found that PCMHs can help improve the quality of care can take time to deliver a return on investment. That means this model may not lower costs right away. Continue reading

Hospice tip sheet offers pointers on data analysis, story ideas

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: PJ Johnson via Flickr

Updated hospice compare data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) had been slated for release on Nov. 21 but was delayed due to what CMS has described as “technical problems.”

Whether you use previous data or analyze forthcoming statistics, what these federal quality measures do not show is just as important as what they do, according to a new AHCJ tip sheet by journalist Cheryl Clark. Continue reading

Active aging tip sheet highlights benefits of proactive wellness efforts

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

There’s aging, and then there’s active aging. The former happens to a person. The latter allows the person to take back some control of the aging process by living a healthier lifestyle and remaining engaged in all aspects of life.

Active aging is both a movement and a life plan. Staying as fully active as possible can change the way we age, according to the International Council on Active Aging. Continue reading