Author Archives: Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Trump administration likely to face legal challenges to its double punch at ACA

The Trump administration dealt a one-two punch to the Affordable Care Act on Thursday. Trump’s executive order would give Americans the option of buying lower-cost health insurance, but also could usher back the bare-bones insurance options that the Affordable Care Act was designed to eliminate.

In addition, Trump directed the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to end the cost-sharing reduction payments (CSRs) to health insurers required under the ACA effective immediately. The payments always have been controversial, and the Trump administration, in justifying its action, noted that House Republicans earlier successfully challenged them in court. Continue reading

Genetic testing company blames press coverage for bankruptcy filing

Charles Piller

Proove Biosciences, a genetic testing company in Irvine, Calif., was placed into court-ordered receivership at the end of August for “restructuring and asset sale.” Proove’s founder and former CEO Brian Meshkin has blamed the company’s financial problems on investigative articles that Charles Piller, West Coast editor for Stat, wrote about the company’s lead product over the last several months, according to Pillar’s coverage of the receivership proceedings.

Meshkin, who called Piller’s reporting about Proove “erroneous and damaging.” He claimed that stories were based on false allegations from disgruntled employees, ignoring that Piller also had quoted genetic testing experts skeptical of the scientific claims behind the Proove Opioid Risk test. Proove has marketed the test as a way for doctors to predict a patient’s likelihood of becoming addicted to opioids. Continue reading

These reports can provide a useful baseline to assess the administration’s health insurance efforts

Source: Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data from the January–March 2017 National Health Interview Survey, September 2017. National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey Early Release Program.For January through March of this year, the rate of Americans who were without health insurance was 8.8 percent, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

Whatever actions Congress and the Trump administration ultimately take to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, or in the short term attempt to weaken it, we already know their efforts will affect how many Americans have health insurance. The question now is how much of an effect their efforts will have.

We have sources that can provide a baseline for discussion, such as the National Center for Health Statistics’ (NCHS) National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Gallup Sharecare Well-Being Index. Both resources base their data on surveys and are regularly updated. Continue reading

One big question remains as single-payer coverage gains popularity: how to pay for it

Graphic: ACAsignups.net

The idea behind a single-payer health care system is simple: Have one entity pay for all health care. The result would be universal health insurance or coverage for all. This idea has long been politically unfeasible because it was considered to cost too much, disrupt almost 20 percent of the economy, and eliminate the need for employer-sponsored health insurance, which covers about half of all Americans. Continue reading

CBO: If Trump kills Obamacare subsidies, expect premiums and deficit to soar

Donald J. Trump

In a report that aligns with predictions by health insurers and groups such as the Kaiser Family Foundation, the Congressional Budget Office on Tuesday forecast that ending cost-sharing reduction (CSR) subsidies under the Affordable Care Act not only would raise premiums for some low-income Americans, but also increase the federal deficit by $194 billion by 2026.

Congressional Democrats had asked both the CBO and the Joint Committee on Taxation to estimate the effect of cutting CSRs after this December – as President Trump has threatened – on the federal budget, health insurance coverage, market stability and premiums. Continue reading