Author Archives: Cynthia Craft

Cynthia Craft

About Cynthia Craft

Cynthia Craft (@cynthiahcraft) is the director of engagement for AHCJ, joining the organization after an extensive career in daily journalism, including a decade on the health care beat. Craft most recently worked as a senior writer at The Sacramento Bee, having also worked for the Los Angeles Times, Dallas Times Herald and the California Journal.

Health Journalism 2019 sets attendance record

Drawn by an influential lineup of speakers and panels – plus an intriguing offering of field trips – more than 800 conference-goers helped make AHCJ’s Health Journalism 2019 in Baltimore a record-setter in attendance.

In AHCJ’s 20 years of annual conferences, the increase in attendance has mirrored the public’s level of interest in health news and need for clear, accurate health care reporting. Today, health-care pocketbook issues, partisan politics and worrisome matters such as the re-emergence of measles and stubborn drug dependence epidemics are seen as topics likely to be front and center in upcoming elections.

From May 2 to May 5, health journalists attended more than 60 panels, including a carefully curated lineup guiding independent journalists toward success and informative sessions on how to cover aspects of the scientific revolution of genetics.

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Brawley’s remarks open #AHCJ19 as the 21st Health Journalism conference draws a record number of attendees

Photo: Pia Christensen/AHCJOtis Brawley kicked off Health Journalism 2019 with a nearly standing-room-only audience.

Otis Brawley has given a lot of thought lately to the socioeconomic factors that serve as predictors of health disparities among disadvantaged Americans.

Brawley, a Bloomberg distinguished professor at Johns Hopkins University, told a crowded room at Health Journalism 2019 in Baltimore on Thursday that a community’s resources – or lack thereof – contributes mightily to the health outcomes of its residents.

That holds true, regardless of race, Brawley explained to attendees at the record-breaking health journalism conference. About 800 people are attending the Baltimore conference, the 21st annual training confab AHCJ has held. Continue reading

Some advance work can help freelancers make the most of #ahcj19 conference

So far, it’s looking as if our upcoming Health Journalism 2019 conference in Baltimore May 2-5 is going to be one of our largest and busiest info-packed gatherings ever.

As the event grows nearer, here’s a handy checklist to help independent journalists, in particular, get ready.

Before the conference, you’ll want to go to our online freelance directory to: Continue reading

Good health reporters know how to size up medical evidence

Care to know more about what it takes to accurately weigh medical evidence? You’ve got just a couple of days to jump in to apply for AHCJ’s Comparative Effectiveness Research Fellowship – the deadline is Friday.

To get an idea of what you’ll walk away with by joining the select group of health journalists headed to Bethesda, Md., Oct. 7-11, read what former CER fellows said: Continue reading

AHCJ mourns investigative reporter Chedekel

Lisa Chedekel

Lisa Chedekel, an active member of AHCJ and an award-winning investigative reporter on health care systems in Connecticut, died of cancer on Jan. 12. She was 57.

In a 2012 member profile, Chedekel told AHCJ member Andy Miller she naturally gravitated toward health as a beat: “For me, in-depth stories about health had a more universal and compelling appeal than other beats I’d covered,” she said. “Stories on health offer both hard data and real people – the two things that, to me, make the best stories.” Continue reading

Making a strong case for attending the upcoming AHCJ conference

Sammy Caiola, a health journalist in Sacramento, is nothing if not prepared. As far back as December, Caiola had delivered a memo to her editor, making the case to approve her attendance at Health Journalism 2018, AHCJ’s annual conference.

The Phoenix training event would be Caiola’s third AHCJ conference, and she figured her best argument was to outline exactly what she’d gotten out of the first two.

Editors can be funny people. Not in the comedic sense, but a bit persnickety. I know. I was an editor for half of my journalism career before joining AHCJ’s staff last fall.

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