Author Archives: Andrew M. Seaman

Andrew M. Seaman

About Andrew M. Seaman

Andrew M. Seaman is a medical journalist with Reuters Health. He started at Reuters as a Kaiser Family Foundation fellow in the D.C. bureau covering health policy and is a 2011 graduate of Columbia University's Journalism School, where he focused on investigative reporting as a Stabile Fellow.

Journalists high on health journalism for AHCJ’s annual conference #ahcj14

AHCJ Audience 2014Journalists from all corners of the U.S. and some other countries gathered in the Mile-High City last week to learn from health care experts and each other at Health Journalism 2014.

For those who couldn’t attend the conference or all the sessions they would have liked, the Association of Health Care Journalists has been posting coverage of the conference to its Covering Health blog – including photos, videos and session recaps.

While at the conference, the journalists took part in field trips, workshops and discussions about topics ranging from oral health to sports medicine.

Two of the conference’s highlights were talks by two experts who continue to impact the world of health care. Continue reading

Sullivan shares experiences with racism, the early days of AIDS and serving under George H.W. Bush #ahcj14

Image by Len Bruzzese

Photo by Len Bruzzese

Louis Sullivan, M.D., recounted his decades of service to medicine to attendees of Health Journalism 2014 on Thursday at the Grand Hyatt in Denver.

In a conversation with Andrew Holtz, Sullivan touched on his experience as the only African American student in his Boston University School of Medicine class in the 1950s, the founding dean and president of the Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta and the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services under President George H. W. Bush.

“Racism is really such a complex thing,” he said. “There’s no easy way to define it,” Sullivan told Holtz when asked about the doctor’s upbringing in the segregated south.

“I think we’re a much better country now than we were 30 to 40 years ago,” he added. Continue reading

Our time in Boston may be over, but the fun continues #ahcj13

Saturday's luncheon featured presentation of the Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism. (Photo: Len Bruzzese)

Photo by Len Bruzzese Saturday’s luncheon featured presentation of the Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism.

Like he did with the snakes of Ireland, St. Patrick and his army of sobriety-challenged Bostonians are sending many of the Health Journalism 2013 attendees home. Fortunately those attendees are now armed with the knowledge to tackle any health story that may come their way.

And while it was impossible to go to every session, the Association of Health Care Journalists has been posting coverage of the conference to its Covering Health blog – including photos, videos and session recaps. They’ll continue to update the blog with more posts from Boston in the days ahead. Continue reading

Professionals aren’t the only journalists coming to Boston #ahcj13

A look at some of the issues, sessions and ideas to keep in mind for those planning to attend Health Journalism 2013, the annual conference of the Association of Health Care Journalists.

While many of the 700 attendees at Health Journalism 2013 in Boston will be professional reporters and editors, there will be about 40 students sitting alongside them.

Eric Jankiewicz, a 22-year-old graduate student, will be making the trip to Boston with the rest of his health reporting class from the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism.

“We’re going because our professor said it’s a really good way to ingratiate yourself in the health and science community,” said the New York native.

Jankiewicz said he became interested in health journalism while reporting on crime and drugs as an undergraduate at New York’s John Jay College. He said he was sometimes reporting on topics, such as synthetic marijuana, that he didn’t fully understand.

“When I went to grad school, I saw the health and science concentration as the perfect way for me to learn about writing about those issues,” Jankiewicz added. Continue reading