AHCJ webcast to offer wider look at lead contamination crisis

Susan Heavey

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at determinants@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: University of California PressNew York-based public health historians Gerald Markowitz and David Rosner, authors of “Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America's Children,” will provide perspective on the nation’s ongoing lead epidemic in a Nov. 4 webcast for AHCJ members.

Photo: University of California PressNew York-based public health historians Gerald Markowitz and David Rosner will provide perspective on the nation’s ongoing lead epidemic in a Nov. 4 webcast for AHCJ members.

At first, the headlines focused on Flint, Mich., but soon other communities around the country were testing their water for lead contamination too. Then residents at a public housing complex near Chicago found themselves displaced along with students at a nearby elementary school after detection of hazardous levels of lead in the soil.

So goes the nation’s ongoing battle over lead poisoning.

Join us for an AHCJ member webcast on Friday, Nov. 4, that may reframe your coverage of lead and its long-term impact on health. The one-hour event, “Long View on Lead: Covering the Crisis From Flint & Beyond,” will feature public health historians Gerald Markowitz and David Rosner, authors of “Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America’s Children.”

Markowitz and Rosner will offer their take on the nation’s long fight against lead poisoning and its devastating health impact, especially when it comes to children. In the shadow of the ongoing crisis in Flint, the experts will give their assessments on the state of environmental health and the history of lead contamination in our aging water infrastructure, in our soil, in paint and other means.

We will examine solutions that have been tried in the past and those being attempted now. We’ll also look at the many hurdles hindering communities from eradicating lead contamination once and for all. Reporters will leave with a better understanding of the environmental impacts affecting various communities, looking in particular at issues of children, race and equality. Participants not only will gain some historical perspective for their ongoing coverage but get some fresh story ideas and angles to cover.

I will moderate the webcast and take members’ questions. The webcast will begin at 2:30 p.m. EST.

Resources

1 thought on “AHCJ webcast to offer wider look at lead contamination crisis

  1. James Dudley Blair

    All, I am not surprised at the attention paid to the horrors associated with the Flint Water Crisis. The consequences of such a scandal will live with us for decades. I would like to discuss an almost forgotten scandal which resulted in thousands of deaths and untold years of pain and suffering. It is almost forgotten because it happened at a time in which it had to compete with other scandals which the media found more newsworthy (salacious).
    The decade of the 1980s was the setting of what many called worst health crisis in recent history. The Arkansas prison-plasma business protected by the Clinton Administration and his cronies. It was also a shameful period of FDA and CDC oversight and international condemnation. Both Bill and Hillary Clinton were said to be aware of the situation, and some say financially benefited from the deadly traffic in death and suffering. Saving lives of Aids victims in Africa will not atone for past crimes against humanity. You decide for yourselves; please read. http://www.salon.com/1998/12/24/cov_23news/

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