AHCJ
circle-cap

Log in ID   Password  
Forgot your password?   

logo mdl
logo btm
spacer
 
spacer
spacer

Coretopic:Aging

New How I Did It

Investigating a homeless facility

Michael LaForgia and Will Hobson investigate an illegal slum in Florida's Hillsborough County. See it now »

New Video

Stresses of caring for an aging parent

Amy Cameron O’Rourke gives a TedX talk in which she questions why some stories about caregivers aren’t written. See it now »

New Tip Sheet

Covering HIV/AIDS and older adults

Janice Lynch Schuster runs down the facts and figures for reporters, as well as public health challenges and ramifications for those living with it. See it now »

Topic overview

The aging of America, the most significant demographic trend of our time, has profound implications for health institutions, families, workplaces, communities, the economy, even the very concept of a normal life trajectory.

The trend accelerated as the first of 78 million baby boomers began reaching the age of 65 in 2011. By 2030, almost one in every five Americans will be 65 or older, up from about one in eight today. By 2050, 88.5 million Americans will be 65 or older, up from 40.2 million in 2010.

The health care implications are enormous, as seniors consume more medical care and account for a larger share of the nation’s health care spending than any other age group. Especially vulnerable are the “oldest old” – people 85 and above, who tend to be more frail and have more significant medical needs. This group is expected to expand from 5.8 million people in 2010 to an estimated 19 million in 2050.

Reporters on the aging beat will want to follow how scientific and medical advances contribute to better health and longer lives for older adults in the years ahead.

READ MORE

Video

Palliative Care and the Human Connection: Ten Steps for What To Say and&nbsp;Do<br /><span>uploaded February 19, 2013</span>

Dr. Diane E. Meier is Director of the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC), a national organization devoted to increasing the number and quality of palliative care programs in the United States. In this video, Dr. Meier discusses 10 important steps in palliative care from over a decade of research. This video will serve as a valuable training tool and guide for medical professionals and their families. Under her leadership the number of palliative care programs in U.S. hospitals has more than doubled in the last 5 years.

What is Palliative&nbsp;Care<br /><span>uploaded May 29, 2008</span>

Diane E. Meier, MD, FACP Director, Center to Advance Palliative Care Director, Hertzberg Palliative Care Institute Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Aging With Diversity in&nbsp;Sharon<br /><span>uploaded August 21, 2007</span>

With one of the area's most diverse senior populations, Sharon has many older residents who are Chinese, Indian, and Russian. They are eager to be a part of the community and many volunteer and socialize at monthly luncheons run by the Sharon Council on Aging and HESSCO Elder Services. Wellness programs, ethnic food, and entertainment are a big draw.

The Aging&nbsp;Brain<br /><span>uploaded March 26, 2008</span>

New studies show that adding creativity and challenging your brain could actually add years to your life. There is evidence that intensive involvement in the arts helped to improve the mental health, physical health, and overall quality of life for the participants. Get more health information about the brain from U.S. News at http://health.usnews.com/sections/health/brain-and-behavior/index.html

When The Mind Says&nbsp;Goodbye<br /><span>uploaded August 19, 2008</span>

Over 5 million adults in the U.S. are now living with dementia; This is the story of George and Adriana Cuevas. Today, they still live together in a residential care home in Petaluma, CA.

"In My Mother's Eyes (A Alzheimer's story)" by Tom&nbsp;Tripp<br /><span>uploaded September 8, 2009</span>

In 1992 my mother was diagnosed with having Dementia.....I took care of my mother during that time...In 2002 she entered a nursing home where she could receive 24 hour care..this is her story... "In My Mother's Eye" a story one women's struggle with Dementia Words written by Tom Tripp and music ('In The Arms Of An Angel') Written by Sarah McLachlan and Josh Groban

Donna Shalala discusses health care reform and&nbsp;seniors<br /><span>uploaded November 5, 2009</span>

From the Aging in the 21st Century workshop held by the Association of Health Care Journalists in Coral Gables, Fla., in October 2009. More at http://www.healthjournalism.org/aging

Ken Dychtwald ASA Presentation 2010 Part 1 of&nbsp;2<br /><span>uploaded June 11, 2010</span>

In this impassioned keynote address - which was part of the general session of the March, 2010 joint convention of the American Society on Aging and the National Council on Aging, Ken Dychtwald, Ph.D. (gerontologist, psychologist, documentary filmmaker and author) rages against America's unpreparedness for the aging of our society, challenges our misaligned healthcare system, sounds a wake-up call to our financially irresponsible population, questions the new purpose of aging and lambasts our leaders for their shortsightedness in public policies pertaining to the age wave.

Ken Dychtwald ASA Presentation 2010 Part 2 of&nbsp;2<br /><span>uploaded June 11, 2010</span>

National Council on Aging, Ken Dychtwald, Ph.D. (gerontologist, psychologist, documentary filmmaker and author) rages against America's unpreparedness for the aging of our society, challenges our misaligned healthcare system, sounds a wake-up call to our financially irresponsible population, questions the new purpose of aging and lambasts our leaders for their shortsightedness in public policies pertaining to the age wave.

Creative Longevity and&nbsp;Wisdom<br /><span>uploaded September 8, 2010</span>

In anticipation of the International Conference on Positive Aging, December 7-10, 2010 in Los Angeles, this film sets forth some of the key themes to be discussed at the conference, such as: what does it take to age well? What does Creative Longevity mean? And what do we need to accomplish ourselves, and in our communities, to ensure that aging is a positive experience? The film, which was produced by the Institute for Social Innovation at Fielding Graduate University, features leading scholars on the subject, including Profs. Valerie Bentz, Connie Corley, Katrina Rogers and author and motivational speaker Connie Goldman. For more information about the conference, please visit www.positiveaging.fielding.edu. For more information about Fielding and the Institute for Social Innovation, please visit www.fielding.edu.

Longevity Genes (1 of 5): Nir Barzilai,&nbsp;M.D.<br /><span>uploaded October 29, 2010</span>

Nir Barzilai, M.D., Principal Investigator http://www.einstein.yu.edu - The Longevity Genes Project at Einstein is a study of more than 500 healthy centenarians, near-centenarians and their children. In this video, principal investigator Dr. Nir Barzilai, director of the Institute for Aging Research and director of the Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging, discusses the findings to date. Dr. Barzilai also explains his personal and professional quest for ways to significantly delay age-related diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and to help people live longer, healthier lives. See News Release. http://www.einstein.yu.edu/home/news.asp?ID=582

Longevity Genes (1 of 5): Nir Barzilai,&nbsp;M.D.<br /><span>uploaded October 29, 2010</span>

Nir Barzilai, M.D., Principal Investigator http://www.einstein.yu.edu - The Longevity Genes Project at Einstein is a study of more than 500 healthy centenarians, near-centenarians and their children. In this video, principal investigator Dr. Nir Barzilai, director of the Institute for Aging Research and director of the Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging, discusses the findings to date. Dr. Barzilai also explains his personal and professional quest for ways to significantly delay age-related diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and to help people live longer, healthier lives. See News Release. http://www.einstein.yu.edu/home/news.asp?ID=582

End-of-Life Expert Susan Tolle on Rolling Out Physicians Orders for Life-Sustaining&nbsp;Treatment<br /><span>uploaded December 10, 2010</span>

In a conversation for California Healthline, Susan Tolle of the Oregon Health & Science University discussed Oregon's experience implementing Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment. Read more: http://www.californiahealthline.org/special-reports/2010/endoflife-expert-susan-tolle-on-rolling-out-physician-orders-for-lifesustaining-treatment.aspx#ixzz17l6of8cD

Introduction to The POLST Video&nbsp;Series<br /><span>uploaded March 5, 2011</span>

http://capolst.org/ POLST (Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment) is a form that states what kind of medical treatment patients want toward the end of their lives. Printed on bright pink paper, and signed by both a doctor and patient, POLST helps give seriously ill patients more control over their end-of-life care.

Tom Gillaspy on Minnesota's Aging&nbsp;Population<br /><span>uploaded March 24, 2011</span>

Tom Gillaspy, Minnesota State Demographer, discusses Minnesota's aging population, and its implications for the future of transportation in the state. March, 2011.

Michio Kaku: How to Reverse&nbsp;Aging<br /><span>uploaded May 31, 2011</span>

Don't miss new Big Think videos! Subscribe by clicking here: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Enzymes like Telomerase and Resveratrol, though not the Fountain of Youth unto themselves, offer tantalizing clues to how we might someday soon unravel the aging process. Question: Do you think the enzyme Telomerase could be used to reverse the aging process in our lifetime? (Submitted by Paul Cellura) Michio Kaku: Paul, Telomerase hit the headlines; however, I think we have to put it into perspective. It is not the fountain of youth; however, it is a significant breakthrough. We have to put it into a much larger perspective. First of all, we know that DNA is sort of like a shoelace. It has plastic tips at the end. Every time a cell reproduces, the tips get shorter and shorter and shorter until finally they fray. And you know that your shoelace, without the plastic tips will simply fall apart. That's what happens inside a cell. A cell, for example, your skin cell, will divide about 60 times, that's called a Hayflick Limit. Then the cell goes into senescence and eventually dies. So in some sense, every cell has a biological clock. It is doomed to die after about 60 reproductions. However, Telomerase can eliminate some of the contraction of the chromosomes and the chromosomes can maintain their length. So at first you may say, "ah-ha! We can now defeat the biological clock." But not so fast, first of all, cancer cells also use Telomerase. Cancer cells are immortal. Cancer cells are immortal and that's precisely why they kill you. Why are cancer cells so dangerous? Because they are immortal. They grow and they grow and they grow until they take over huge chunks of your body, meaning that your bodily functions cannot be performed and you die. So we have to make sure that when you hit ordinary cells with Telomerase that you don't also trigger cancer in the process. Now, also you have to realize that genes are also very essential for the aging process. It turns out that we know what aging is. Aging is the buildup of error. That's all aging is. The build up of genetic and cellular error. And cells begin to age; they begin to get sluggish because genetic mistakes start to build up. Now cells; however, have a repair mechanism. They can repair damage to their cells; otherwise we would all basically rot very soon after birth. However, even the repair mechanisms eventually get gummed up and then the cell really starts to get old as a consequence. So then the question is, can you accelerate cell repair? That is another branch of gerontology which is being looked at using genes and using chemicals to accelerate the repair mechanisms. For example, if I take any organism on the planet Earth from yeast cells to spiders, insects, rabbits, dogs, and even monkeys now. And I reduce their caloric intake by 30%, they live 30% longer. In fact the only organism which has not yet been deliberately tested by scientists are homo sapiens. All the other species obey this basic rule. You starve them to death, they live longer. This is independent of Telomerase. This is a function of the wear and tear that we have on the cells. And this is the only known way of actually deliberately extending the lifespan of any organisms almost at will. Now, what we want is a genetic way of mimicking this mechanism without having to starve yourself because how many people do you know would be willing to starve themselves in order to live 30% longer? Not too many. So then the question is, are there genes that control this process. And the answer is apparently, yes. There's something called the Sirtuin genes, Sir2 being the most prominent of them. They in turn stimulate certain enzymes, among them Resveratrol, which is found in red wine, for example. So this does not mean that drinking red wine or taking Telomerase is the fountain of youth. I don't think that anyone has the fountain of youth yet. What I am saying is, we are now finding pieces of the fountain of youth, tantalizing clues that mean that perhaps in the coming decades, we might be able to actually unravel the aging process. We don't have it yet. Don't go out to the drug store and stock up on these kinds of chemicals and enzymes thinking you're going to live forever. However it is conceivable that in the coming decades we'll come very close to finding it.

Who Needs Long-Term Care, and Who Pays for&nbsp;It?<br /><span>uploaded November 22, 2011</span>

About 70 percent of Americans over age 65 will eventually need some form of long-term care. This can mean nursing home care. But more commonly, it means help at home with activities such as dressing, cooking and eating. Many people think Medicare covers long-term services and supports. With limited exceptions, it does not, as this video points out. Featuring Bruce Chernof, MD, president and CEO of The SCAN Foundation, dedicated to helping seniors receive integrated medical treatment and human services in the setting most appropriate to their needs. This video is part of a series produced by the Alliance for Health Reform, a nonprofit, nonpartisan health policy education group in Washington, DC. See more videos at www.allhealth.org.

How Does the Health Reform Law Promote Long-Term&nbsp;Care?<br /><span>uploaded November 22, 2011</span>

Most people think the new health reform law simply increases the number of people with health coverage in the U.S. But it does more. It also contains a number of provisions to help people get long-term supports and services at home, or if need be, in a nursing home. This video outlines some of the ways in which the Affordable Care Act promotes long-term care. Featuring Bruce Chernof, MD, president and CEO of The SCAN Foundation, dedicated to helping seniors receive integrated medical treatment and human services in the setting most appropriate to their needs.

Alzheimer's Association -&nbsp;Alan<br /><span>uploaded June 26, 2012</span>

Alzheimer's Association -&nbsp;Maggie<br /><span>uploaded June 26, 2012</span>

Alzheimer's Association -&nbsp;Charles<br /><span>uploaded September 11, 2012</span>

Global aging: key challenges, solutions &&nbsp;opportunities<br /><span>uploaded March 6, 2013</span>

One key issue addressed at the recent World Economic Forum (WEF) was the rapidly increasing global aging population; and how to prepare for its profound impact on global health, as well as the direct economic, social and political implications. Global experts from the WEF Global Agenda Council on Ageing led this discussion in Davos and presented a new report outlining key challenges/opportunities associated with global aging, including how to improve healthy aging through the innovation of global health systems and investment in long-term health options; as well as specific initiatives to seize the social and economic opportunity created by the aging population.

Gail Wilensky and Bruce Vladeck- Saving&nbsp;Medicare<br /><span>uploaded July 31, 2013</span>

A new Alliance for Health Reform video features two former Medicare administrators -- Gail Wilensky and Bruce Vladeck -- on their ideas about how to save the program. Ms. Wilensky, who ran Medicare in a Republican administration, argued for increasing the eligibility age of Medicare for future retirees, while still making the program available at age 65 for those who are disabled. Mr. Vladeck, said that postponing retirement made him "extremely uneasy," though. "I think there are an awful lot of Americans now who would really like to be working into their late sixties and early seventies, whose only alternatives at the moment are minimum wage jobs at Walmart or at McDonald's." The two agreed, however, that the country has an aging problem, and that recent cost growth rates in Medicare won't continue, even if costs remain low per beneficiary because there will be more people aging into Medicare. "The crisis," said Vladeck, "is 10 or 15 years from now, when we are going to have to face up to the fact that you can't cover 50 percent more people for the same amount of money." Wilensky called it a "significant problem in our future. It's not going to go away." Mr. Vladeck, said that postponing retirement made him "extremely uneasy," though. "I think there are an awful lot of Americans now who would really like to be working into their late sixties and early seventies, whose only alternatives at the moment are minimum wage jobs at Walmart or at McDonald's."

Longevity Genes (1 of 5): Nir Barzilai,&nbsp;M.D.<br /><span>uploaded October 29, 2010</span>

Nir Barzilai, M.D., Principal Investigator http://www.einstein.yu.edu - The Longevity Genes Project at Einstein is a study of more than 500 healthy centenarians, near-centenarians and their children. In this video, principal investigator Dr. Nir Barzilai, director of the Institute for Aging Research and director of the Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging, discusses the findings to date. Dr. Barzilai also explains his personal and professional quest for ways to significantly delay age-related diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and to help people live longer, healthier lives. See News Release. http://www.einstein.yu.edu/home/news.asp?ID=582

Crowdsourcing

Got a suggestion, comment or link? Enter the information and submit.

Calendar

Upcoming events on Aging from the AHCJ calendar.

spacer spacer spacer
  spacer
spacer spacer spacer