Tag Archives: transportation

Communities grapple with the needs of aging suburbanites

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: Rachel via Flickr

Mom, dad, 2.4 kids, and a dog. The very picture of suburbia has changed vastly since families migrated from cities in the 1950s and ’60s. Those kids are now aging baby boomers, often caring for elderly parents. If they remained in the suburbs, they now are facing a host of challenges they probably didn’t anticipate.

Meeting the needs of aging suburbanites is a growing problem that few community planners considered during the post-World War II building boom. Continue reading

Community-based program trains seniors to aid seniors

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in NextAvenue.com, Journal of Active Aging, Cancer Today, Kaiser Health News, the Connecticut Health I-Team and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement at George Washington University and co-produces the HealthCetera podcast.

Photo: Barbara Wells via Flickr

Photo: Barbara Wells via Flickr

An innovative program in Orange County, N.C., taps into older adults’ leadership skills — and trains them to give back to the community. Project EngAGE helps people age 55 years and older build relationships with community leaders and organization so they can advocate for other older adults who may need social services, housing or other assistance.

Jan DuMont, 71, a retired nurse who moved to the area from Washington, D.C.,  enrolled in the 13-week program, which covers a range of health and aging services specific to the older population. As this News-Observer article explains, they serve as senior resource leaders who address important concerns among other older adults in the community. “We help to address gaps in the system,” she said in a phone interview. Continue reading

Check out this primer on issues affecting health in rural areas

Susan Heavey

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at determinants@healthjournalism.org.

Transportation and other social determinants of health are covered in the Rural Assistance Center’s recently updated guide on the topic. Seen here is an older form of rural transportation from Fort Worth, Texas, where AHCJ recently held a workshop on rural health issues.

Photo: Susan HeaveyTransportation and other social determinants of health are covered in the Rural Assistance Center’s recently updated guide on the topic. Seen here is an older form of rural transportation from Fort Worth, Texas, where AHCJ recently held a workshop on rural health issues.

When I flew to Forth Worth, Texas, recently for AHCJ’s Rural Health Workshop, I should have read this first.

The Rural Assistance Center, a collaborative and federally-funded information portal on rural health and related services, offers a topic guide on the social determinants of health, specifically looking at social factors such as affordable transportation, access to food and the environment and their impact on people’s health.

The recently updated guide, “Social Determinants of Health for Rural People,” is a great primer for anyone starting to delve into how certain aspects of life for those living in less populated areas affect their well-being. Continue reading

Transportation options for Health Journalism 2015 attendees #ahcj15

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Hyatt Regency Santa Clara

Visitors seeking San Jose airport shuttle service or transportation to Hyatt Regency Santa Clara for Health Journalism 2015 have a variety of options, including taxi service and airport shuttle transportation.

Here are some ways to get to or from Mineta San Jose International Airport (SJC). Contact the Hyatt Regency Santa Clara concierge desk for additional advice at 408-200-1234. The Hyatt Regency Santa Clara does not provide complimentary airport shuttle service.

Getting around Silicon Valley: AHCJ member Stephen Beale has researched and written a comprehensive guide to getting around the Bay Area, even if you don’t have access to a car. Read his advice.

Passengers with disabilities encounter obstacles in everyday commuting

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Despite progress prompted by the Americans with Disabilities Act, public transportation for people with disabilities is still challenging in many places.

The Washington Post‘s Dana Hedgpeth found that, on D.C.’s Metro system, people who rely on wheelchairs, canes and other aids are confronted by broken elevators, narrow walkways, dilapidated platforms, poor lighting and signage.

Metro has a door-to-door shuttle called for those with disabilities called MetroAccess but Hedgpeth says it is more costly, charging based on the time of day and distance a customer travels. One passenger says the service isn’t reliable and forces her to make travel arrangements a day in advance.

The accessibility issues can be downright dangerous at times. Hedgpeth cites cases in which people in wheelchairs have fallen and a blind man fell onto the tracks.

How do people with disabilities in your community get around? Is the system truly useful? Hedgpeth’s article should give you plenty of ideas about what to look for in a transportation system from the perspective of people with disabilities:

  • Can someone sitting in a wheelchair see signs?
  • Are announcements clear for people with impaired hearing?
  • How often are elevators out of service and, when they are broken, what is the alternative?
  • If there is an alternative system for passengers with disabilities, is it affordable? Do people using it face extremely long commutes or wait times?

The National Center on Disability & Journalism has information and a style guide for journalists covering disability issues.