Tag Archives: transparency

AHCJ webcast to examine drug prices, other cost challenges

Susan Heavey

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at determinants@healthjournalism.org.

Photo" Phillip Bradshaw via Flickr

Photo” Phillip Bradshaw via Flickr

Mylan’s price hike for its EpiPen allergy medication fueled an Internet storm this week, with consumers and U.S. legislators expressing outrage over its decision to raise the price about 400% since 2007 to as much as $500 or more. The backlash appeared tied in part to timing as U.S. children head back to school, with parents of those needing EpiPens to treat allergic reactions coming to grips with the hefty price tag.

The incident brought echoes of another drug price hike – the 2015 increase by Turing Pharmaceutical’s malaria and HIV medicine Darapim, another move that brought scrutiny by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee of the company’s chief executive officer. Continue reading

Incremental progress seen in price transparency, but report may rate A+ among journalists

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Source: Report Card on State Price Transparency Laws — July 2016, Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute, Sandy Hook, Conn., and Catalyst for Payment Reform, San Francisco.Here’s how price transparency should work for a woman with a silver-level insurance plan in one state. Assume this consumer could go to any hospital and would choose based on the cost of care, meaning her out-of-pocket costs (deductible plus co-insurance). She could pay $5,079 at the highest-priced facility or $3,531 at the lowest-priced hospital. The difference between the two is $1,548.

Source: Report Card on State Price Transparency Laws — July 2016Here’s how price transparency should work for a woman with a silver-level insurance plan in one state. Assume this consumer could go to any hospital and would choose based on the cost of care, meaning her out-of-pocket costs (deductible plus co-insurance). She could pay $5,079 at the highest-priced facility or $3,531 at the lowest-priced hospital. The difference between the two is $1,548.

Progress toward widespread price transparency comes slowly, according to the latest annual report from the Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute (HCI3) and the Catalyst for Payment Reform (CPR). In the “Report Card on State Price Transparency Laws – July 2016,” issued on Tuesday, the authors, Suzanne Delbanco, CPR’s executive director, and François de Brantes, HCI3’s executive director, explained what states are doing to give consumers the information they need to shop for care based on price.

As in past years, most states are doing poorly: 43 states earned an F grade for failing to meet even minimum standards. Last year, 45 states got an F. Continue reading

Survey of AHCJ members finds biggest access problems at federal level

Felice J. Freyer

About Felice J. Freyer

Felice J. Freyer is a member of AHCJ's board of directors, serving as vice chair of the organization's Right to Know Committee. She is a medical writer for The Providence (R.I.) Journal.

Source: AHCJ member survey, 2016

Source: AHCJ member survey, 2016

Health journalists seeking information from government agencies often encounter obstacles, especially at the federal level, according to AHCJ’s recent survey. The biggest roadblocks involve delays, bureaucracy, scripted replies, and barriers to interviews, survey respondents said.

Three-quarters said it is difficult to get the information they need from the federal government, and two-thirds reported difficulty getting adequate responses from state government. Continue reading

High court ruling could affect state efforts to collect insurance claims data

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: dbking via Flickr

Photo: dbking via Flickr

When the U.S. Supreme Court ruled March 1 in Gobeille v. Liberty Mutual, the justices gave journalists a chance to write about how the case affects state efforts to collect data for their all-payer claims database (APCD) programs.

In a 6-2 decision (pdf), the court ruled against the plaintiff, allowing Liberty Mutual Insurance Company to withhold its employees’ health claims data from Vermont’s APCD.

The plaintiff was Alfred Gobeille, chairman of Vermont’s Green Mountain Care Board. Under Vermont law, the board is charged with controlling the rate of growth in health care costs through “regulatory and planning tools.” One tool is Vermont’s all-payer claims database. We covered this case when it was argued before the court in December. Continue reading

Calif. publishes better insurance price and quality data, but gaps remain

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

California Healthcare Compare provides price and quality data for hospitals and physicians in 18 regions of California.

Source: California Healthcare Compare and Consumer ReportsCalifornia Healthcare Compare provides price and quality data for hospitals and physicians in 18 regions of California.

California has embraced the Affordable Care Act in big way. It launched one of the first and most robust state-run health insurance exchanges, and expanded its Medicaid program (known as Medi-Cal) to enroll the uninsured.

As a result, the state’s uninsured rate dropped from 6.5 million residents in 2013 (which is 17.2 percent of the state’s population) to 4.8 million last year (12.4 percent), according to the U.S. Census Bureau. (See AHCJ’s coverage of the bureau’s latest data release here and here.) Continue reading