Tag Archives: price

Consumers Union expert weighs in on drug price hikes, other cost challenges

Susan Heavey

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at determinants@healthjournalism.org.

Lynn Quincy

Lynn Quincy

Mylan’s price hike for its EpiPen allergy medication is just the latest example of health care costs pressuring consumers, Consumers Union’s Lynn Quincy told AHCJ members in a recent webcast.

Quincy, who leads the consumer-advocacy group’s Healthcare Value Hub and has backed efforts to curb rising drug prices, pointed to other recent price increases such as those by drugmakers Valeant and Turing as symptoms of a massive “market failure.” Continue reading

A look at the landscape in health care price transparency

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: Tax Credits via Flickr

Photo: Tax Credits via Flickr

High deductibles and out of pocket costs – which are increasing in both Affordable Care Act exchange plans and employer-sponsored coverage – have given new urgency to helping patients (or “consumers” as they’re called nowadays) learn about the cost and quality of care.

If you know both cost and quality, you know more about the value of care. (Assuming the treatment actually is the right and necessary course of care, but that’s a whole other conversation.)

Many programs and experiments are underway to figure out which tools are helpful to patients, how patients are using them, and what are their impact on health spending and utilization. The findings so far can perhaps be summed up as  “meh.” Continue reading

Incremental progress seen in price transparency, but report may rate A+ among journalists

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Source: Report Card on State Price Transparency Laws — July 2016, Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute, Sandy Hook, Conn., and Catalyst for Payment Reform, San Francisco.Here’s how price transparency should work for a woman with a silver-level insurance plan in one state. Assume this consumer could go to any hospital and would choose based on the cost of care, meaning her out-of-pocket costs (deductible plus co-insurance). She could pay $5,079 at the highest-priced facility or $3,531 at the lowest-priced hospital. The difference between the two is $1,548.

Source: Report Card on State Price Transparency Laws — July 2016Here’s how price transparency should work for a woman with a silver-level insurance plan in one state. Assume this consumer could go to any hospital and would choose based on the cost of care, meaning her out-of-pocket costs (deductible plus co-insurance). She could pay $5,079 at the highest-priced facility or $3,531 at the lowest-priced hospital. The difference between the two is $1,548.

Progress toward widespread price transparency comes slowly, according to the latest annual report from the Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute (HCI3) and the Catalyst for Payment Reform (CPR). In the “Report Card on State Price Transparency Laws – July 2016,” issued on Tuesday, the authors, Suzanne Delbanco, CPR’s executive director, and François de Brantes, HCI3’s executive director, explained what states are doing to give consumers the information they need to shop for care based on price.

As in past years, most states are doing poorly: 43 states earned an F grade for failing to meet even minimum standards. Last year, 45 states got an F. Continue reading

Panel offers ideas on uncovering true costs of health care at #AHCJ16

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

money-and-medicineFor those of us covering health insurance, one of the best sessions at Health Journalism 2016 addressed the challenging issue of how to find the true cost of health care.

Moderator Bruce Japsen, who writes about health care and health policy for Forbes, kept the focus on where reporters can look to uncover the actual cost of care in their communities.

That generated a terrific pro tip from panelist Chad Terhune of Kaiser Health News. Continue reading

Calif. publishes better insurance price and quality data, but gaps remain

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

California Healthcare Compare provides price and quality data for hospitals and physicians in 18 regions of California.

Source: California Healthcare Compare and Consumer ReportsCalifornia Healthcare Compare provides price and quality data for hospitals and physicians in 18 regions of California.

California has embraced the Affordable Care Act in big way. It launched one of the first and most robust state-run health insurance exchanges, and expanded its Medicaid program (known as Medi-Cal) to enroll the uninsured.

As a result, the state’s uninsured rate dropped from 6.5 million residents in 2013 (which is 17.2 percent of the state’s population) to 4.8 million last year (12.4 percent), according to the U.S. Census Bureau. (See AHCJ’s coverage of the bureau’s latest data release here and here.) Continue reading