Tag Archives: payments

Is value-based pricing doomed? #AHCJ17 session to address this question

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Paul Levy, former chief executive of Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, recently made a compelling argument in a blog post about why value-based pricing for hospital services ultimately will fail.

In “The Game That Shows Why Value-Based Pricing Is Doomed” on AthenaInsight, Levy argues that the incentives in value-based pricing are all wrong. As a payment model, value-based pricing promotes selfishness but at the same time requires all parties to cooperate, he writes.

It’s not often that anyone criticizes value-based care, and why would they? That would be like opposing the use of grocery coupons. Continue reading

Panel to examine MACRA, the physician payment overhaul law

Rebecca Vesely

About Rebecca Vesely

Rebecca Vesely is AHCJ's topic leader on health information technology and a freelance writer. She has written about health IT since the late 1990s for a variety of publications.

Given the ACA’s uncertain future, some experts have said that another law, MACRA, could lead the way on provider payment reform and accountable care innovations.

At the AHCJ’s Health Journalism 2017 conference in Orlando, a panel of providers will discuss their implementation of MACRA rules so far (reporting began on Jan. 1), and what the law means for their practices and their patients. A trade group representative from Washington, D.C., will give an overview of the law and where regulations stand in the Trump administration. Continue reading

Potential, implementation struggles of health IT highlighted at workshop

Rebecca Vesely

About Rebecca Vesely

Rebecca Vesely is AHCJ's topic leader on health information technology and a freelance writer. She has written about health IT since the late 1990s for a variety of publications.

Health information technology is fundamental to health care moving forward, said multiple speakers at the Journalism Workshop on Health Information Technology in San Francisco on Oct. 13 and 14.

“I view health IT as the circulatory system for health care,” said David Blumenthal, M.D., president of the Commonwealth Fund.

But Blumenthal and others said that now we are “struggling with the process” of realizing the full potential of health IT. Continue reading

Untying the knots of MACRA

Rebecca Vesely

About Rebecca Vesely

Rebecca Vesely is AHCJ's topic leader on health information technology and a freelance writer. She has written about health IT since the late 1990s for a variety of publications.

Photo: Emily via Flickr

Photo: Emily via Flickr

When I think about the forthcoming physician payment and EHR incentive program, known as MACRA, it brings to mind macramé, the 1970s crafting fad of tying cords to make decorative household items.

When I think about macramé, I naturally think about knots. And when I think about knots, I start thinking about MACRA again, because MACRA is an extremely knotty topic – even for health care.

In a new tip sheet, I attempt to untangle MACRA by laying out the basics. MACRA is important for journalists to understand because it is about to become a big deal for physician practices across the country.  It’s arguably the biggest change to physician payments in 20 years. And it will require physicians to continue down the path to EHR adoption and interoperability. Continue reading

Getting behind the confusion that leads some to lose their subsidized health insurance

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: frances1972 via Flickr

Photo: frances1972 via Flickr

We posted recently about California’s assessment of who was dropping out of the exchange, including the finding that most people leaving Covered California were getting health insurance elsewhere.

But as Abby Goodnough later reported from Yazoo City, Miss., that’s not always the reason for higher turnover in other areas. Retaining enrollees is a challenge – and affordability is one big reason. That’s true even for people whose premiums are heavily subsidized. Continue reading