Tag Archives: insurance

Hospitals, health systems struggle to define population health

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Population health was a term that became popular as Congress was passing the Affordable Care Act in 2010. In the seven years since then, hospitals and health systems have struggled to define the term consistently.

For example, you see from this article by Tamara Rosin for Becker’s Hospital Review that health system administrators use the terms “population health” and its twin “population health management” to describe what they do to keep patients healthy and out of the hospital. The problem is that settling on one definition is a challenge, Rosin wrote. Continue reading

Harsh CBO score doesn’t ease the path of Senate Republicans writing their repeal bill

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org.

Photo by Sean Stayte via flickr.

If Senate Republicans were hoping that this week’s new CBO score of their revamped House health bill was going to make life easier for them … Not so much.

House leaders had worked hard to revise American Health Care Act when they couldn’t get the votes. But the Congressional Budget Office found that the projected impact of the amended version, which narrowly passed the House in early May, wasn’t all that different than the original.

The old bill would have led to 24 million fewer Americans having coverage in a decade. The new bill, according to CBO, would mean 23 million would not be covered. Continue reading

Reporters must contend with readers’ perceptions, ‘fake facts’

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org.

In my blog posts, I usually try to highlight stories that have a lesson – something that you can take and apply to your own reporting on health reform.

This story  by the Washington Post’s Jenna  Johnson doesn’t have such a clear-cut, practical “how-to” aspect. But I’ve found myself thinking about her opening anecdote again and again since I read it, so I figured it’s time to share.  Continue reading

Keep employer plans in focus as ACA ‘repeal-and-replace’ proposals are rolled out

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: Katy Warner via Flickr

Most of the coverage offered under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is through the individual market (plans sold in the exchanges) or Medicaid. But as Jay Hancock of Kaiser Health News explains in a new AHCJ tip sheet, that doesn’t mean the employer-sponsored insurance system won’t be touched by any plan to repeal and replace the ACA.

Changes to how health care is subsidized – directly through tax credits or indirectly through tax breaks – may have a profound impact on the job-linked insurance that covers more than 150 million people. Continue reading

Reporter uncovers ripple effect of her state’s Medicaid policies

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: Patrick Feller via Flickr

Houston Chronicle reporter Jenny Deam last year wrote an in-depth story about how a mill is closing in a Texas town cost people not only their livelihood but also their health coverage. Because the mill was so crucial to Cuero’s economy, that closure had ripple effects that overshadowed the beleaguered community.

Deam’s Aug. 8, 2016, story, “No job. No insurance. No chance at ‘Obamacare.’ No safety net in Texas. Welcome to Cuero,” is a sharp reminder that many of the uninsured are hard-working people – or at least they would be if the mill had not closed and left them without work and insurance. Continue reading