Tag Archives: Census data

You don’t have to wait for 2020 for U.S. Census health data

Susan Heavey

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at determinants@healthjournalism.org.

The U.S. Census Bureau offers data beyond the nation’s population. It has statistics on everything from health insurance and disability to veterans and HIV/AIDS. This map shows the proportion of doctor’s offices across the country. Source:“Number of People per Doctor's Office by County and Counties with No Doctor's Offices,” U.S. Census Bureau.

The U.S. Census Bureau offers data beyond the nation’s population. It has statistics on everything from health insurance and disability to veterans and HIV/AIDS. This map shows the proportion of doctor’s offices across the country. Source: “Number of People per Doctor’s Office by County and Counties with No Doctor’s Offices,” U.S. Census Bureau.

The nation’s next population count won’t come until 2020, but in the meantime reporters can use the U.S. Census Bureau to find a host of data related to health disparities, including income, poverty status, race, age, gender and housing.

We have created this tip sheet to help AHCJ members search for information and spot trends as they cover stories whether nationally or in a particular state, county or city. You can even search by ZIP code. Continue reading

New Census data can show way to stories, sources

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

The Census Bureau will release its American Community Survey five-year estimates on Tuesday, Dec. 14. You can find useful information in the data with just a few mouse clicks – if you know where to look. In this tip sheet, veteran reporter Frank Bass shows you step by step what you can learn from Census data and how to find that information.

That data can help you portray your community accurately by providing a break down of age groups, types of disabilities, poverty status and even how many people have health insurance.

Use the poverty data to identify the communities you should be talking to about urban health problems, such as chronic illnesses and greater complications. Other data will help you determine how many people are covered by certain types of health insurance or how many households are receiving food stamps.