Tag Archives: awards

2013 winners named in top health journalism awards

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates social media efforts of AHCJ and assists with the editing and production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Tune in for the 2013 winners

See the announcement of the 2013 winners of the Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism. Read more about each winner, including a summary of the entry. AHCJ members can click on the title of the entry to see the questionnaire about how the story was reported.

An investigation that found criminals running diet supplement companies, a series revealing the failure of hospitals to provide life-saving newborn screening tests and an examination of efforts to prevent childhood deaths in Africa and Asia were among the top winners of this year’s Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism.

First-place awards also went to articles that looked at the potential dangers of acetaminophen, the reasons behind a high suicide rate in Montana and what happens to veterans who lose their health benefits when they are discharged for minor offenses.

See the complete list of winners.

AHCJ members win honors for their reporting

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates social media efforts of AHCJ and assists with the editing and production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

AHCJ-logoJoin AHCJ in congratulating members John Fauber, Rhiannon Meyers, Tracy Weber, Charles Ornstein and Jennifer LaFleur for their recent accomplishments.

Read on for details about their work and honors. Continue reading

AHCJ member news: Reporting awards, job changes, new publications

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates social media efforts of AHCJ and assists with the editing and production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Constance Alexander’s spoken opera, “The Way Home,” is featured in “Scenes from the Common Wealth: Short Plays & Monologues by Kentucky Women.” Focused on end-of-life issues, “The Way Home” was inspired by a series of interviews Alexander conducted in conjunction with a documentary series she produced for WKMS-FM, with accompanying articles in the Murray (Ky.) Ledger & Times, where she is a freelance columnist.

A Crack in the Pavement,” a novel by Georgie Binks, has been published by Goodweather Publishing Inc. The book, partly based on a true story, addresses what some women have experienced after having prenatal genetic testing and deciding to terminate their pregnancies. Binks is an award-winning journalist in Toronto.

Dan DeNoon, formerly of WebMD and the Harvard Heart Letter, has joined the press office at the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention in Atlanta.

USA Today reporter Peter Eisler, with Alison Young and John Hillkirk, won the online category of the National Academy of Sciences Communications Award for the series “Ghost Factories,” an investigation into abandoned lead factories.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel’s John Fauber and independent journalist Joanne Silberner, a former National Public Radio correspondent, will share the 2013 Victor Cohn Prize for Excellence in Medical Science Reporting. Fauber is recognized for his “relentless and exemplary investigative reporting on conflicts of interest in medicine and industry,” which has been a frequent Covering Health topic. Silberner is recognized for her coverage of “neglected diseases in developing countries, as well as her outstanding coverage of health policy at NPR.”

Silberner, with David Baron, also won the radio/TV/film category of the National Academy of Sciences Communications Award for a series of radio and web stories about cancer in developing countries that appeared on PRI’s ”The World.” She also shared the “Best Cancer Reporter Award for 2013“ from the European School of Oncology with Tiffany O’Callaghan, opinion editor with the UK’s New Scientist magazine. The award also was for covering the growing crisis of cancer in developing countries.

I-News Network senior reporter Kevin Vaughan has joined Fox Sports 1 as a full-time enterprise-investigative reporter. He will remain in Denver, where he formerly worked for The Denver Post and Rocky Mountain News.

Award winners share their tips for reporting significant stories #ahcj13

Jocelyn Wiener

About Jocelyn Wiener

Jocelyn Wiener is an independent journalist in Oakland, Calif. She is attending Health Journalism 2013 on an AHCJ-California Health Journalism Fellowship, which is supported by The California HealthCare Foundation.

Alison Young was among the first-place award winners who offered reporting tips.

Photo by Pia ChristensenAlison Young was among the first-place award winners who offered reporting tips. The panel also included (left to right) Lisa Krieger, Kate Long, Hoag Levins, Rita Rubin, Janet Adamy, Barbara Benson, Kate Lazar, David Heath and Jill Rosenbaum.

How does one report a story that has real impact? Ten of the first-place winners of this year’s Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism shared their tips during a panel at Health Journalism 2013. Among the highlights:

Request patient records
Janet Adamy of The Wall Street Journal, along with Tom McGinty, won first place in the health policy category (large) for “The Crushing Cost of Care” – their story chronicling the life and death of Scott Crawford, a 41-year-old heart transplant patient who racked up one of the country’s highest Medicare bills. Adamy said most hospitals have a form on their website that patients can sign to request their medical records. Continue reading

Winners of top health journalism awards announced

Julie Appleby

About Julie Appleby

Julie Appleby is a senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News. She is secretary of the Association of Health Care Journalists board of directors, and has been chair of AHCJ's annual Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism contest since its inception.

An investigation revealing concerns about unnecessary treatments by private dental firms – along with stories showcasing the enormous financial toll of medical care and the cost of dying – were among the top winners of this year’s Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism.Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism

First-place awards also went to a series that investigated long-forgotten lead factories and the dangers they pose to nearby residents, coverage of the compounding pharmacy linked to the national outbreak of fungal meningitis, the toll obesity is taking on residents of one state and the effect of violence against those living with HIV.

See the complete release and the list of winners.

AHCJ member news: Books, awards and job changes

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates social media efforts of AHCJ and assists with the editing and production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Luis Fabregas‘ new book, “A Transplant for Katy,” takes the reader behind the scenes of the transplant capital of the world, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, where college student Katy Miller underwent a liver transplant. The 2005 surgery went awry, prompting a feud between Thomas Starzl, known as the father of transplantation, and administrators at the medical center. Fabregas is a reporter at the Pittsburgh (Pa.) Tribune-Review.

Steve Fredman‘s book, “The Troubled Health Dollar: How it Affects the Care We Receive,” has been published.

Kenny Goldberg, health reporter at KPBS, received the 2012 Inspiration Award for Media from the San Diego Chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness for his coverage of suicide.

Joe Goldeen, health care reporter at The Record in Stockton, Calif., received the 2012 Media Champion Award from the Healthy San Joaquin Collaborative “in recognition of … contributions to changes that promote, support and encourage healthy choices and environments in San Joaquin County communities.”

Journalist Frederik Joelving ‏ is leaving Reuters Health to travel and do long-form journalism.

Richard L. Peck, former editor-in-chief of Long-Term Living, has written a book, “The Big Surprise,” that advises families on dealing with the long-term care system. He describes it as “a small book of readable, bite-sized blogs updated from ones I did originally for the facility search site SnapForSeniors.com.”

Maria Simbra‘s report, “Heart Attack Survivors At Risk for Developing PTSD”, has been nominated in the 2nd Annual Media & Mental Health Awards in the TV news segment category. The Media & Mental Health Awards are presented to stories that accurately report behavioral health within television, radio, print, and online media in southwestern Pennsylvania.

Jocelyn Wiener and Emily Bazar of the CHCF Center for Health Reporting received a California Journalism Award for stories they did about a lack of access to dental care for children under Medicaid in California.

Do you have news to share with your fellow journalists? Send it to info@healthjournalism.org for a future blog post.

Call for entries opens for health journalism awards

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates social media efforts of AHCJ and assists with the editing and production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Entries for the 2012 Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism are now being accepted.

Following on changes begun last year, the contest retains its topic-based categories, where entries compete head-to-head no matter whether they appeared in magazines, newspapers, trade publications or on radio or television stations or websites.Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism

The Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism recognize the best health reporting in print, broadcast and online media. The contest is run by journalists for journalists and is not influenced or funded by commercial or special-interest groups. The contest features 12 categories and entries can include a wide range of health coverage including public health, consumer health, medical research, the business of health care and health ethics.

Read more …

New jobs, awards and more: Get the latest news about AHCJ members

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates social media efforts of AHCJ and assists with the editing and production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Patricia Anstett, medical writer at the Detroit Free Press for 22 years, is among 22 staffers to get a buyout and will retire from the paper. A founding member of AHCJ, she worked at two Chicago dailies; a Washington, D.C., features syndicate; Congressional Quarterly and The Detroit News. She mentored a dozen interns through the Kaiser Health Reporting and AAAS fellowships. She can be reached at patkiska@aol.com.

Jeff Baillon, an investigative reporter at KMSP-Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minn., won a regional Edward R. Murrow award for a piece he did on a young boy with autism.  The piece documented the tremendous strides the boy made in his development after his family obtained a specially trained therapy dog.

Heather Boerner has been named a Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism Fellow, through the University of Southern California and the California Endowment. She is working on a project about health care access for undocumented workers.

Ellen Durckel spent 11 days in August producing segments for The Today Show, Good Morning America and NBC Nightly News.

Freelance writer Micky Duxbury was part of a team producing an investigative series on the effects of incarceration on Oakland communities for KQED News associate Oakland Local.

Dirk Hanson won the 2012 CPDD/NIDA award from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence, for media coverage that increased “public understanding of scientific issues concerning drug use disorders.”

Markian Hawryluk, health reporter at The Bulletin in Bend, Ore., was named a Knight-Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan for the 2012-13 academic year.

Carolyn Hirschman, senior writer/editor for the National Institute on Aging Information Center, is also administrator of the Center’s Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials database.

Tamara Jeffries will moderate a panel for the Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellowship. She also was selected to attend the NIH’s “Medicine in the Media: The Challenge of Reporting on Medical Research.”

Sandra Jordan of The St. Louis American won Best Business Story for weeklies in its class in the 2012 Missouri Press Association awards for excellence in journalism. She was recognized for a series on diversity at BJC HealthCare compared to peer hospital systems.

Prerna Mona Khanna, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.P., F.A.C.P.M., was awarded the “Breaking Barriers” Award by the Chicago Foundation for Women for her work over the past 20 years in print, magazine, television, radio and online medical journalism.

Chris King and The St. Louis American won Best Coverage of Government for weeklies in its class among many other awards in the 2012 Missouri Press Association awards for excellence in journalism.

Richard Kirkner recently joined the Springer Vision Care Group in Ambler, Pa., as executive editor of Ophthalmology Management and Retinal Physician magazines. Previously, he was editor-in-chief of Optometry Times, an Advanstar publication based in North Olmsted, Ohio.

Gergana Koleva will pursue a master of science degree in health policy at the Harvard School of Public Health. In the meantime, she will continue to cover patient safety and health care fraud as a contributing writer for Forbes.com.

Peggy Pico‘s series about undergoing chemotherapy for stage 3 breast cancer won first place from SPJ’s San Diego chapter.

David Pittman, formerly of FDAnews, is now the Washington Correspondent for MedPage Today.

Paul Raeburn is taking over as chief tracker (chief media critic) at the Knight Science Journalism Tracker. He will be posting five days a week, praising and critiquing science stories, medical stories, health policy stories, and other works of science or health care journalism.

Gary Schwitzer, publisher of HealthNewsReview.org,  spoke to journalists, policy makers, physicians, public health professionals and medical librarians at the 14th annual Rocky Mountain Workshop on Evidence-Based Health Care in Steamboat Springs, Colo., in July.

Do you have news to share with your fellow journalists? Send it to info@healthjournalism.org for a future blog post.

AHCJ member news: The latest on awards, new assignments and more

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates social media efforts of AHCJ and assists with the editing and production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Members of AHCJ have been busy! Here’s the latest update on our members who have won awards, taken new jobs and have other news of interest.

Beryl Lieff Benderly is this year’s winner of the IEEE-USA Award for Distinguished Literary Contributions Furthering the Public Understanding of the Profession (of engineering) for a cover story on biomedical engineering she did for Prism magazine, for which she is a contributing editor.

Sean Carr, formerly the Washington bureau manager for A.M. Best’s News Service, joined SNL Financial, a global news service, as a senior reporter covering insurance and financial services.

Robert Davis, president and editor-in-chief of Everwell, a health video website, has released his book, “Coffee Is Good for You,” with Penguin/Perigree.

Katherine Eban, an independent journalist who writes for Self, Vanity Fair and other national titles, has recently contracted with Fortune as a contributing writer. She will write four long-form investigative pieces each year, which will focus predominantly on pharmaceutical, medical or public health issues.

Allyn Gaestel, an independent journalist based in Philadelphia, was awarded a Kaiser Media Fellowship to work at The Philadelphia Inquirer over the summer.

Kenny Goldberg, a health reporter with KPBS news, won a Golden Mike award in the category of Best Light Feature from the Radio Television News Association of Southern California for his television piece on wheelchair dancing.

Tara Haelle, a graduate student at the University of Texas-Austin, began writing for DailyRX.com as a condition leader for prenatal, sleep and nutrition issues. She also launched a blog of health and science news for moms called Red Wine & Apple Sauce. She is on track to complete her master’s report for graduate school this spring, which will tellsthe stories of people affected by vaccine-preventable diseases through journalistic features and photographic portraits.

Harriet Hodgson, an independent journalist and author of 30 books, has been appointed as a forum editor for the Open to Hope Foundation.  Hodgson will respond to posts about the death of an adult child, something she has experienced.

Jodie Jackson Jr., reporter and blogger at the Columbia (Mo.) Daily Tribune, was awarded second place in the Missouri Associated Press Media Editors 2011 news writing contest. The award was in the community affairs/public interest category for “Patients in Peril?” He also received a 2011 Missouri Public Health Association media award for significant contributions to health education in the state.

Steve Jacob’s book, “Health Care in 2020,” was published in January. Jacob is an independent journalist from Culleyville, Texas.

Richard M. Kirkner has been named editor-in-chief of Optometry Times, an Advanstar publication. A 20-year veteran of health care media, Kirkner will work out of his Phoenixville, Pa., office and report to the Advanstar Medical Communications Group editorial headquarters in North Olmstead, Ohio.

Steven Z. Kussin, M.D., F.A.C.P., an independent journalist based in Clinton, N.Y., is the founder and director of The Shared Decision Center, a patient advocacy center dedicated to educating patients about alternative approaches to their medical problems. Kussin’s book, “Doctor, Your Patient Will See You Now,” was also named amongst top 10 health titles of the year by Booklist.

Independent journalist Claudia Perry started a three-month training program with The Heartland Group in Chicago. She is working on a memoir about living with chronic conditions.

André Picard, longtime health reporter at Toronto’s Globe and Mail, was awarded the College of Family Physicians of Canada Lectureship Prize. It is the first time a non-physician has been honored. Picard donated the $15,000 cash portion of the award to Médecins Sans Frontières. In November, Picard also received the National Child Day Award from the Canadian Institute for Child Health for his “dedication to improving the health of children.”

Yanick Rice Lamb, associate publisher/editorial director of Heart and Soul magazine, participated in the Cancer Issues Fellowship sponsored by the National Press Foundation in December and the Knight Digital Media Center‘s workshop at the University of California, Berkeley, in January. She was recently accepted into April’s Kiplinger Program in Public Affairs Reporting at Ohio State University. Rice Lamb was invited to join the National Advisory Council of the Center for Health Media and Policy at Hunter College.

Bryan Thompson, a health reporter at Kansas Public Radio, recently completed the National Public Radio/Kaiser Health News project, “Health Care In The States.” This workshop, which deepened the 24 participants’ understanding of issues surrounding the Affordable Care Act, included a week of intensive training in Washington and is followed by a four-month mentorship with editors from NPR and KHN.

San Francisco-based independent journalist Laurie Udesky published an article about dangerous prescription drugs in nursing homes for The Bay Citizen that also appeared in The New York Times.

Harriet Washington, an independent journalist from Albany, N.Y., published her book, “Deadly Monopolies: The Shocking Corporate Takeover of Life Itself and the Consequences for Your Health and Our Medical Future,” with Doubleday in November.

Share your news

If you have news to share about a new job, fellowship, award or other accomplishment, please send us a note about it to info@healthjournalism.org to be featured in a future Covering Health post and in HealthBeat, AHCJ’s printed newsletter.

Polk Award recognizes reporting on unusual Medicare claims, reimbursements

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates social media efforts of AHCJ and assists with the editing and production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

AHCJ member Christina Jewett, a reporter at California Watch, was honored alongside her colleagues, Lance Williams and Steven K. Doig, with the George Polk Award in Medical Reporting for her work on “Decoding Prime,” a yearlong investigative series that exposed how a California-based hospital chain billed Medicare for rare conditions and in turn banked on huge bonus payments.

To do this, the team analyzed more than 51 million hospital admissions records from 2005 through 2010. It also unveiled stories from doctors, nurses and medical coders who were at odds with the chain’s practices.

Earlier:

Reporters uncover Calif. chain’s systematic upcoding