Category Archives: Public health

#AHCJ16 roundtable to discuss the landscape of urban health challenges

Susan Heavey

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at susan@healthjournalism.org.

Cleveland March # 49 via photopin (license)#AHCJ16 in Cleveland includes a key discussion with the top health leaders from Cleveland, Baltimore and St. Louis on cities’ health challenges, one of several sessions looking at health disparities.

Cleveland March # 49 via photopin (license)#AHCJ16 in Cleveland includes a key discussion with the top health leaders from Cleveland, Baltimore and St. Louis on cities’ health challenges, one of several sessions looking at health disparities.

There’s no shortage of good panels at this week’s Health Journalism 2016 in Cleveland, especially for reporters interested in social factors that impact health. I’m particularly excited about an opening day roundtable discussion with top health officials from Baltimore, St. Louis and Cleveland that will focus on urban health challenges.

Before you join us at “Covering the health angles of cities facing crisis,” which runs from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 7, here’s a quick look at recent coverage of some of the major health issues in each city: Continue reading

Backers of water fluoridation get boost from Calgary studies

Mary Otto

About Mary Otto

Mary Otto, a Washington, D.C.-based freelancer, is AHCJ's topic leader on oral health, curating related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on oral health resources at mary@healthjournalism.org.

Tooth decay rates among children in Calgary, Canada have spiked in recent years.

The authors of two newly published studies say they suspect a decision by Calgary officials to discontinue the city’s water fluoridation program in 2011 could be to blame. Continue reading

Homeless get ‘older’ at younger ages than their peers, research says

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in Kaiser Health News, The Atlantic.com, New America Media, AARP.com, Practical Diabetology and Home Care Technology report. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College in New York City, and co-produces HealthStyles for WBAI-FM/Pacifica Radio.

Neil Moralee via Flickr

Photo: Neil Moralee via Flickr

Homeless people in their 50s have more geriatric conditions than those who are decades older but have a roof over their heads, according to researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

Because of prolonged exposure to stress, those living in poverty often experience premature aging, also known as weathering. Weathering can dramatically impact those without stable housing, causing individuals to prematurely age by 10 to 20 years beyond their chronological age. In addition to premature aging, the stress of homelessness affects morbidity and mortality. Continue reading

Coverage of Zika continues as researchers, reporters learn more

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates social media efforts of AHCJ and assists with the editing and production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Photo: CDC/ Prof. Frank Hadley Collins, Dir., Cntr. for Global Health and Infectious Diseases, Univ. of Notre Dame

Photo: CDC/Prof. Frank Hadley Collins, Dir., Cntr. for Global Health and Infectious Diseases, Univ. of Notre Dame

Zika has been in the news since the beginning of the year in the United States, but health officials and journalists are still working to understand and explain the virus.

I collected some relevant resources for reporters on Jan. 28 (updated on Jan. 29) and many of those sites have been updated with the latest information.

Here is some notable coverage as well as resources that have emerged since then: Continue reading

Calculating the multiple costs of Flint’s water crisis

Susan Heavey

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at susan@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: Bottle Heaven via photopin (license)

Photo: Bottle Heaven via photopin (license)As federal, state and local health officials work to resolve Flint’s water crisis, cost has become a central issue in addition to grappling with the long-term effects of lead contamination.

About $7.50 a gallon. That’s how much bottled water can cost when purchased in typical 17-ounce (500 milliliter) containers, according to Business Insider. On average, the publication reported, it costs $1.22 a gallon compared with about 4 cents per gallon for tap water.

In Flint, Mich., responding to the city’s ongoing water contamination crisis is showing the health divide in sharp relief – not just in health impacts, but also economic ones. Continue reading