Category Archives: Health care reform

Despite $30 billion spent to improve it, health information technology rated a top patient safety issue

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: Claudia Brauer via Flickr

Just seven years after the federal government announced plans to invest in health information technology (HIT) for physicians and hospitals, those new systems are listed in a report Wednesday as the number one cause of patient safety concerns.

In the report, Top 10 Patient Safety Concerns for 2016, the ECRI Institute said HIT configurations that do not support each other were the number one patient safety issue for hospitals and other health care provider organizations. Continue reading

Panel will assess continued growing pains of health reform in the states #AHCJ16

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org.

road-to-cleveland-2For several years now, I’ve moderated an AHCJ conference panel on health reform in the states and will do it again this year at Health Journalism 2016 in Cleveland. We’ll get pretty granular this year, looking at two specific states – Massachusetts and Washington state – and provide a national overview of how states are looking ahead to next year to solve some of their persistent challenges.

Those challenges include a relatively low rate of young and healthy people signing up, persistent public misconception about what the law does and does not do, and of course, affordability, affordability, affordability. Continue reading

What doctors really think about ACA and the role their politics play

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org.

thumbs-up-and-downWe have reams of data showing that people’s views of the Affordable Care Act largely align with their political view – Republicans hate it, Democrats like it (but by and large don’t love it.) That’s been a consistent finding in national polls and it’s particularly clear in the monthly Kaiser Family Foundation tracking polls.

What about doctors? Are their personal politics also coloring their view of the law passed six years ago? Apparently – yes, at least among primary care doctors and nurse practitioners. Continue reading

Financial services journalist provides pointers on connecting the dots in the co-op failure story

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: Jack Zalium via Flickr

Don’t take my word for it. Check out what others have said about Adam Cancryn’s coverage of the growing number of failures among the health insurance co-ops.

In a piece for the Columbia Journalism Review, Trudy Lieberman wrote “Adam Cancryn’s Nov. 11 article for SNL Financial on America’s incredible shrinking insurance co-ops is the story I’ve been waiting for someone to write: the best account to date of why, and how, the insurance co-op experiment is failing,” Lieberman wrote, adding that it’s “one of the best Obamacare stories I’ve seen since the debate on the law began.” Continue reading

What’s behind dramatic differences in Medicare Advantage, ACA enrollments?

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org.

money-and-medicineMedicare Advantage enrollment is soaring, defying expectations after $150 billion in spending cuts over a decade that were part of the Affordable Care Act. The Congressional Budget Office expected about a 30 percent falloff – but enrollment has risen by 50 percent to more than 17 million people.

The ACA exchange enrollment is way under expectations. About 12.7 million people signed up this year – and not all will pay their premiums and stay enrolled. The CBO had forecast 21 million for this year. Continue reading