Category Archives: Insurance

Repeal and replace: The chaotic Senate approach

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: William Allen via Flickr

Confused about which bill the Senate is going to take up to begin its ACA repeal debate?

So is the Senate.

Remember the grief Nancy Pelosi took for saying, “we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what’s in it” during the Affordable Care Act debate? Continue reading

Newly covered Nev. residents face prospect of no insurer on exchanges

Joanne Kenen

About Joanne Kenen

Joanne Kenen, (@JoanneKenen) the health editor at Politico, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health reform and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on health reform resources and tip sheets at joanne@healthjournalism.org.

Source: Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of insurer rate filings and news reports

Amy Goldstein of The Washington Post has a great look at a “bare county” in rural Nevada – a county that has benefited from the Affordable Care Act but now has no insurer willing to offer coverage there next year, no matter what ultimately happens to repeal in Congress.

She visited Lyon County, which includes “a stretch of highway that Life magazine once called the loneliest road in America.” Continue reading

Health care debate shines light on Medicaid

Susan Heavey

About Susan Heavey

Susan Heavey, (@susanheavey) a Washington, D.C.-based journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants of health and curates related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on resources and tip sheets at determinants@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: Dmitriy via Flickr

One result of the ongoing health care reform debate – and the coverage of it – is a renewed look at Medicaid by both journalists and the public.

The joint federal-state government health insurance program is often thought of as simply serving the poor, but Republicans’ efforts to roll back Obamacare’s expansion of the coverage also opened up efforts to educate readers about other beneficiaries, according to some analysts.

Even as Republicans in the Senate appeared to run out of options this week, the debate over the program is likely to continue. Continue reading

For N.C. reporter, news brief led to series on solitary confinement, mental illness

Joseph Burns

About Joseph Burns

Joseph Burns (@jburns18), a Massachusetts-based independent journalist, is AHCJ’s topic leader on health insurance. He welcomes questions and suggestions on insurance resources and tip sheets at joseph@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: Thomas Hawk via Flickr

In most states, care for those with behavioral health problems is so poor that the nation’s prisons have become the default treatment centers for many of the most vulnerable mental health patients. As Congress wrestles with plans to cut funding for Medicaid, many observers are calling for more coverage.

For an example of a mental health system that relies on state prisons, see the work of Taylor Knopf, a reporter for North Carolina Health News. In the spring of 2015, Knopf was working for the Raleigh News & Observer when an editor asked her to write a news brief about an effort to improve the state’s use of solitary confinement. Seeing an opportunity, Knopf made a few calls and did more than write a brief: Over the next year, she turned that assignment into a two-part series on how the prison system used solitary confinement to discipline inmates for even minor infractions.

In a new “How I Did It” article, Knopf writes about the series and how her reporting focused on one inmate’s struggle to adjust to life outside of prison after being held in solitary confinement for almost three years. Continue reading

Breaking down the revised BCRA and the Graham-Cassidy alternative plan

Pia Christensen

About Pia Christensen

Pia Christensen (@AHCJ_Pia) is the managing editor/online services for AHCJ. She manages the content and development of healthjournalism.org, coordinates AHCJ's social media efforts and edits and manages production of association guides, programs and newsletters.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell released the Senate’s revised Better Care Reconciliation Act on Thursday. The major change was incorporating demands from Sen. Ted Cruz to allow insurers to offer less expensive plans that have less robust coverage. It also would allow people to pay premiums using money in health savings accounts. And it allocates $45 billion to opioid addiction treatment.

Meanwhile, Sen. Lindsay Graham and Sen. Bill Cassidy were on CNN talking about their alternative to the plan, which would keep many of the federal taxes and send that money to the states to spend as they see fit. The plan would keep in place the essential benefits of the ACA and would continue to protect people with pre-existing conditions from being denied coverage. Continue reading