Category Archives: Aging

New tip sheet offers ideas for reporting on drug therapies

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in Kaiser Health News, The Atlantic.com, New America Media, AARP.com and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College in New York City, and co-produces HealthStyles for WBAI-FM/Pacifica Radio.

drug-therapy-graphstockEffective reporting requires health journalists to be comfortable independently evaluating clinical studies and drawing their own conclusions about data. If you just rely on information from press releases, it’s akin to committing “journalistic malpractice,” as AHCJ Vice President Ivan Oransky often warns.

A new tip sheet from Bonny P. McClain adds to this fountain of knowledge. McClain explores why and how The International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) can be a valuable partner in navigating our complex and ever-changing health system. Continue reading

New tip sheet helps reporters shape Medicare coverage

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in Kaiser Health News, The Atlantic.com, New America Media, AARP.com and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College in New York City, and co-produces HealthStyles for WBAI-FM/Pacifica Radio.

Philip Moeller

Philip Moeller

Why are the nuances of Medicare benefits so complicated? While journalists may never find the answer to this question, they can be more aware of this challenge as they shape their reporting.

Medicare’s arcane and overlapping regulations mean consumers often lose or are penalized for benefits for which they are entitled, according to journalist Philip Moeller, who writes about aging and related issues for PBS NewsHour and Money. Continue reading

Aging population means dental care access issues becoming more acute

Mary Otto

About Mary Otto

Mary Otto, a Washington, D.C.-based freelancer, is AHCJ's topic leader on oral health, curating related material at healthjournalism.org. She welcomes questions and suggestions on oral health resources at mary@healthjournalism.org.

Photo: lawrence_baulch via Flickr

As America’s population ages, the shortage of dental care for the nation’s elders presents a growing problem.

Many seniors lack public or private coverage that would help defray the cost of dental services, according to a new fact sheet from the Pew Charitable Trusts.

“Perhaps the single greatest barrier is the inability to afford care,” Pew noted in its brief. “Seniors with dental insurance are 2.5 times more likely than those without coverage to visit a dentist and about half of seniors lacked insurance in 2015.” Continue reading

New portrait of older adults emerges from federal report

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in Kaiser Health News, The Atlantic.com, New America Media, AARP.com and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College in New York City, and co-produces HealthStyles for WBAI-FM/Pacifica Radio.

Photo: thinkpanama via Flickr

Today’s older population is mostly better off than prior generations when it comes to health and poverty, and they’re also living longer. But incidence of chronic conditions is up, and older adults today spend proportionally more of their income on health care.

These are some of the latest findings from the 2016 edition of Older Americans: Key Indicators of Well Being, from the Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics. Continue reading

Projected increase in health spending poses dilemma for policymakers

Liz Seegert

About Liz Seegert

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in Kaiser Health News, The Atlantic.com, New America Media, AARP.com and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College in New York City, and co-produces HealthStyles for WBAI-FM/Pacifica Radio.

Photo: Doyle Saylor via Flickr

The aging population is a key driver of increased health spending, according to a new report from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

Total health care spending growth is expected to average 5.8 percent annually from 2015-2025, but population aging is anticipated to contribute to faster overall growth in national health spending from 2020 to 2025. However, projected spending growth remains lower than the average over previous two decades before 2008 (nearly 8 percent). Continue reading