Author Archives: Andrea King Collier

Andrea King Collier

About Andrea King Collier

Andrea King Collier (@andreacollier) is an independent journalist in Lansing, Mich. She attended Health Journalism 2016 on an AHCJ-Ethnic Media Health Journalism Fellowship, which is supported by the Leona M. & Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust.

Health officials talk about cities in crisis, disparities in health #AHCJ16

Photo: Pia Christensen/AHCJHealth officials from four cities that have faced recent crises shared their perspectives on addressing health disparities during a roundtable at Health Journalism 2016. Susan Heavey, left, moderated the panel featuring Leana S. Wen, M.D., Melba R. Moore, M.S., C.P.H.A., Abdul El-Sayed, M.D., D.Phil., and Natoya Walker Minor, M.P.A.

Photo: Pia Christensen/AHCJHealth officials from four cities that have faced recent crises shared their perspectives on addressing health disparities during a session at Health Journalism 2016. Susan Heavey, left, moderated the panel featuring Leana S. Wen, M.D., Melba R. Moore, M.S., C.P.H.A., Abdul El-Sayed, M.D., D.Phil., and Natoya Walker Minor, M.P.A.

Health Journalism 2016 kicked off a powerful lineup of panels with a roundtable on covering the health angles of cities facing crises. Susan Heavey, who is AHCJ’s topic leader on social determinants and a reporter at Reuters, led the discussion featuring Leana Wen, M.D., health commissioner in Baltimore; Melba Moore, M.S., acting director of health/commissioner of health, City of St. Louis, Abdul El-Sayed, M.D., the executive director and health officer of the Detroit Health Department and Natoya Walker Minor, the acting director of the Cleveland Department of  Public Health.

All the panelists work in what they called “legacy cities,” older urban cities that have been under siege with issues that have kept them in the headlines. Continue reading

New models bridge the gap in health care news #ahcj14

Necessity has become the mother of innovative business models for local news. It’s no secret that vanishing news outlets and shrinking staff at the outlets are causing a void in solid investigative reporting, that can be expensive and labor intensive to produce. Entrepreneurial journalists who are passionate about news have taken on the challenge with online news enterprises at the local, state and national levels.

At Health Journalism 2014 in Denver, Laura Frank, the executive director of I-News at Rocky Mountain PBS; Carol Gentry, editor of Health News Florida; Tim Griggs, a fellow at The Texas Tribune; Rosemary Hoban, editor of North Carolina Health News; and moderator Andy Miller, the editor of Georgia Health News; talked about the opportunities and challenges of creating new models for doing the deep dive into covering health news.

Gentry said the goal at Health News Florida is to fill the gap in coverage that went by the wayside. The site, which launched in 2007, “works hard to provide small investigations, but we don’t do anything that duplicates what is already being done out there,” Gentry said. “We only work to fill in the gaps in coverage, and we break news.”

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Broadcasters suggest strategies to tell health care stories #ahcj13

Broadcast – radio and television – is an important part of storytelling. News outlets want even more from journalists than ever before. Readers and viewers want stories that answer their questions. But how do you find strong video and audio ways into stories that often seem just perfect for print? A panel at Health Journalism 2013 explored some ways.

John Palfreman, Ph.D., the KEZI distinguished professor of broadcast journalism at University of Oregon and seasoned documentary producer for Frontline, says the story of health care reform is not yet “sticky.” He says that journalists have to continue to put those stories out there.

“Some of the hardest stories to tell are around the economics of health care. But they are the most needed,” Palfreman said. Continue reading