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Awards: FAQs

Awards for Excellence in Health Care JournalismAwards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism

By Journalists. For Journalists.

Contest FAQ

What are the Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism?

Who is eligible for the contest?

What work is eligible?

How much does it cost to enter?

What are the categories?

Can I enter the same article or series in multiple categories?

What are the sizes?

Could I get more explanation of the categories?

Can trade stories be entered in categories other than trade?

How can I enter?

What do I need to fill out the entry form and what do I need to answer on the questionnaire?

What file types may be uploaded?

How do I make a PDF?

Why do online entrants need to upload a file?

How should television and radio entries be submitted?

I write for a newspaper chain and my stories ran in a number of our papers. Which category do I enter?

How many names may be on each entry?

How many stories can be submitted per entry?

Is there a limit to the number of entries I may submit?

Can books be submitted to the contest?

May I submit an entire newsletter for judging?

May I submit supplemental material?

When is a cover letter required?

Why is it important for me to check the release box allowing AHCJ to put entries on its website?

How will entries be judged?

What do I get if I win?

What is the deadline for entering the contest?

To whom should I direct questions?

What are the Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism?

The awards were created in 2004 by the Association of Health Care Journalists to recognize the best health reporting in print, broadcast and online media. The winning entries also may be used by AHCJ in educational efforts – to help improve the caliber of health care journalism.

Who is eligible for the contest?

Anyone who has written about health, including public health, consumer health, medical research, health policy or the business of health care.

Association members pay a discounted entry fee, but non-AHCJ members may still enter. Members of the AHCJ board, employees and contest committee members are not eligible to enter the contest. Contest screeners and judges may enter because they never review entries in their own categories.

Entries originally published in languages other than English are allowed. See rules.

What work is eligible?

All work published or aired between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31, 2014.

How much does it cost to enter?

We offer an early-bird discount for those entries submitted by Dec. 19, 2014. The rate for these entries is $30 for members and $55 for nonmembers.

Regular entries must be submitted via our online entry process by Jan. 16, 2015, or earlier. These entries will cost $50 for members and $75 for nonmembers. Payment may be made online by credit card or called in to the AHCJ office. Checks should be made payable to the Association of Health Care Journalists. Join the Association and receive the member rate.

If you are unable to use the online entry process, call the AHCJ office for guidance. Staff can usually assist you over the phone. If you are still unable to digitize or upload your entry, AHCJ staff will quote you a price to complete the work for you.

What are the categories?

(See more details below)

Beat Reporting (all sizes)
An individual award for outstanding beat coverage. Entrants should explain the beat on the questionnaire and may submit up to four stories, carrying a single byline. The same stories may also be submitted in other categories.

Health Policy (large and small division)
Stories that explore access to health care, medical quality and costs, as well as decisions about health care made by government, employers and other stakeholders

Public Health (large and small division)
Stories that deal with health – often of a large population – rather than specific medical research or a specific individual.

Trade (all sizes)
Articles from publications catering exclusively or primarily to specific groups, such as healthcare professionals, advocacy groups or organizations. Trade stories can also be entered in other categories, following rules on circulation size in those categories divided by size.

Business (large division and small division)
Stories that explore where money and medicine intersect.

Investigative (large division and small division)
Stories that shed light on things the public should know, but government, private industry or others would rather remain secret

Consumer/Feature (large division and small division)
Stories that delve into difficult issues regarding illnesses, diseases, procedures or tests, as well as stories with a strong news-you-can- use focus.

Can I enter the same article or series in multiple categories?

In general, no. An article or series can be entered in only one category. The exception: If you enter the beat category, you may choose one story from a series to be used as one of your four samples. Also, if two organizations collaborate on a story or project, they should also coordinate their entry so that only one version of that entry is received.

What are the sizes?

Categories applying to "all sizes" will seek the best work in that topic category regardless of outlet size.

Categories denoting "large division and small division" will judge work in that topic category against work from similar-sized outlets. Those size divisions are:

Large:
Newspapers above 100,000 circulation and their affiliated websites
Network or syndicated TV and radio
Local TV and radio in top 50 markets
National and regional online outlets, including blogs
Magazines above 500,000 circulation
Trade newsletters above 35,000 circulation
National or regional wire services

Small:
Newspapers below 100,000 and their affiliated websites
Local TV and radio in below-top-50 markets
Locally focused online outlets, including blogs
Magazines below 500,000 circulation
Trade newsletters below 35,000 circulation

Applicants employed by large category outlets need to enter in the large category even if the entered work appears in a smaller outlet affiliated with the employer.

Could I get more explanation of the categories?

Story examples listed under these categories are not meant to be exclusive. They are meant to give an idea of the types of stories that could fit within the categories.

Beat reporting: This category showcases beat coverage during the year, aiming to highlight reporters who show a mastery of the topic. Entrants may submit up to four stories, carrying a single byline, to provide a representative sample of your work. In the questionnaire, the entrant should explain the beat. Entrants may also submit the same stories in other categories.

Health policy: This category explores how policy decisions affect consumers, taxpayers, and businesses, often with a focus on government, which is a major source of funds for the health system through Medicare, Medicaid, the Veteran’s Administration and other programs. Government agencies, such as the FDA, also oversee much of this sector. Stories can encompass a wide range of topics including how Medicare and Medicaid are operating, state efforts to boost coverage of the uninsured, the implementation of the federal health care law, what employers are doing to control rising health costs and controversies over regulation of the health sector, such as efforts to oversee insurers, hospitals, pharmaceutical companies or device makers. Stories might also include examinations of medical care quality, underuse and overuse.

Public Health:  This category is for stories that examine efforts to protect, promote or analyze health in specific populations – from whole countries down to neighborhoods. Such stories may examine specific treatments, but not generally as the primary focus of the article. Topics might include whether communities have access to healthy foods, or have an excessive burden of pollution, smoking rates or other health problems – exploring the causes and potential solutions. Stories about the impact of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and asthma, could also fall under this category, as could stories about preparing for flu or bioterrorism. If the story is mainly about treatments or tests, it should be entered in a different category. If it’s about a community and a variety of generally non-medical interventions, it’s more likely to be a public health story.

Trade: This category is not for publications or websites aimed at general interest audiences. Compared with articles written for the general public, the entries in this category may include more numbers and statistics, and more complicated technical and scientific terms. Previous contestants in this category have included Health Affairs, Modern Healthcare, EpilepsyUSA, ABA Child Law Practice, Oncology Times, Trustee Magazine, Hospitals & Health Networks, Physicians Practice and TheHeart.org.

Business: This category could include coverage of hospitals, medical groups, insurers, health technology, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical device makers and the rising cost of medical care.  Stories could also include ways that employers – one of the main purchasers of health care in this country – are attempting to slow the growth of their spending. Submissions in this category are likely to have a follow-the-money element and focus on the industry or the economics of delivering health care. What is the cost of the new treatment, test, drug or procedure, not only to individual patients, but to society?

Investigative: This category may include single stories or a designated series on the same topic. There is a wide variety of areas that could be submitted in this category, including investigations of problems at local hospitals or nursing homes, under-the-table agreements, troubles with medical devices or drugs, disparities in how medical care is provided to different communities, trafficking in counterfeit drugs, lax oversight of licensed medical professionals and other problems.

Consumer / Feature: This category is for submissions aimed at explaining complicated health care topics to a general audience. Stories could include those that delve into difficult issues involved with health care, such as how far to go with end-of-life care, the cost/benefit tradeoffs of new treatments or drugs or heart rending first-person stories about facing life with Alzheimer’s or other medical conditions. The category also covers stories that assist consumers in navigating the health care system, from selecting a Medicare plan to appealing an insurance company denial.

Can trade stories be entered in categories other than trade?

Yes. Trade stories can be entered in the trade category or other categories. But note that if you enter in one of the size-divided categories, your entry must reflect the size of your publication. Trade publications are considered large if their circulation or readership is over 35,000, and small if it is below that number.

Joint collaborations between trade and other types of publications cannot be entered in the trade category.

How can I enter?

To make the process easier on members and judges, we switched to an online registration/submission/judging process. Go to healthjournalism.org/awards. Once we have announced the call for entries, you will be able to click on a link that says “Enter contest.” Follow the instructions to set up an account, fill out your entry form and questionnaire and upload your submission. The site also gives you an option of paying the entry fee online.

There is a 100 MB limit for uploaded materials. For television or radio entries larger than that, a five-minute clip should be uploaded and the complete entry should be shipped on DVD or CD. The online site will instruct you how to submit the copies on disc. Shorter radio or television entries can be submitted entirely online.

Applicants with entries originally published in languages other than English must also upload an accurate translation, along with a letter from the news outlet certifying the translation's accuracy and the name and contact information of the translator.

What do I need to fill out the entry form and what do I need to answer on the questionnaire?

You will need to fill out the online entry form (click here for a sample entry form) and answer the questionnaire. Here are the questions on the questionnaire:

  1. List date(s) this work was published or aired, and through which media outlet.

  2. Provide the title of your story or series and the names of the journalists involved. (Although the entry form limits you to listing the three main reporters, you may mention others who helped here.)

  3. Provide a brief synopsis of the story or stories, including any significant findings.

  4. Explain types of documents, data or Internet resources used. Were FOI or public records act requests required? How did this affect the work?

  5. Explain types of human sources used.

  6. Results (if any).

  7. Follow-up (if any). Have you run a correction or clarification on the report or has anyone come forward to challenge its accuracy? If so, please explain.

  8. Advice to other journalists planning a similar story or project.

What file types may be uploaded?

All print materials should be submitted in PDF format. This includes any cover letter, broadcast transcripts or translations.

Radio entries should be submitted in .MP3 or .WAV format.

Television entries should be submitted in .MOV, .AVI, .WMA, .WAV, .MP4, .FLV or .WMV formats.

Online entries, in addition to providing up to four Web addresses, must include at least one file (either PDF or audio/video file) showing the main story of the entry in its entirety.

How do I make a PDF?

PDF (Portable Document Format) files are required to submit several contest entry types. If your entry is not already a PDF, there are several ways to copy your work to that format:

  • If you have the full version of Adobe Acrobat (not simply the Reader), then you have the software to save your work as PDF.
  • If you work for a news organization, those managing the website or the company’s IT department likely have software, such as Adobe Acrobat, to copy the entry into PDF.
  • If you or a colleague owns a scanner, it likely has the ability to save the scanned documents as PDF.
  • If you are freelancer or otherwise do not have access to scanner or Adobe Acrobat, local copying centers such as FedEx Office or a UPS Store have the ability to scan documents and save them as PDF at nominal costs.
  • Public or college libraries often have scanners and the appropriate software to save your work as PDF.
  • Some websites – www.freepdfconvert.com or www.zamzar.com, for example – allow you to upload a file in one format, then download a file converted to PDF at no cost.
  • Other sites - www.web2pdfconvert.com, for example – allow you to convert Web pages into PDF.

If you have tried these sources and are still having difficulty, contact AHCJ offices, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday, at 573-884-5606.

Why do online entrants need to upload a file?

While the online entry form encourages the use of web links, AHCJ wants to archive your work so that even if links do not work in the future, journalists can still learn from your entry.

How should television and radio entries be submitted?

The submission website will accept television and radio stories up to 100 MB, which may require the entry be shortened. If you wish to submit your piece in full, please send television entries by mail to the AHCJ office on DVDs. (Include five copies.) Radio entries should be sent on CD. (Include five copies.) Through the contest website, you can print out the first page of your entry form to include with the DVD or CD.

The mailing address is:
AHCJ Contest
10 Neff Hall
Columbia, MO 65211
(Include this phone number if required on shipped packages: 573-884-5606)

I write for a newspaper chain and my stories ran in a number of our papers. Which category do I enter?

If you work primarily for a single paper and your chain picked up the story after it ran in your paper, you would enter the size category reflecting the size of the paper where you work. If the story was specifically written to be used by the entire group of papers, you would enter the category reflecting the paper with the largest circulation. (If, for example, your story ran in three papers with circulations of around 50,000, but also in the Sunday section of your biggest paper, with a circulation of 175,000, the entire entry would fall into the large-size division.)

How many names may be on each entry?

A maximum of three individuals may be named, one of whom must be the lead writer. If there are more than three significant contributors to the work, the entry should be submitted in the name of the news organization. The beat reporting category is an individual award.

AHCJ pays only one prize for each winning entry.

How many stories can be submitted per entry?

Generally, only one story per entry is allowed. However, a maximum of four pieces – such as a main bar and up to three side bars on the same topic on the same day – may be submitted in each entry. A designated series of articles may be submitted in its entirety, up to a maximum limit of 10 pieces. A designated series either has a logo or text identifying it as a series centering on a single, narrowly defined topic. (EXAMPLE: Series examining hospital cost growth, but not a wide ranging set of stories under an umbrella term like “hospitals.”) In the "beat reporting" category, up to four individual stories may be submitted.  If you are uncertain about where your entry falls on this rule, email your question to contest@healthjournalism.org

Is there a limit to the number of entries I may submit?

No, but each entry requires its own entry fee and entry form. 

Can books be submitted to the contest?

At this time, the contest does not include a category for health books. We may consider one at a later date.

May I submit an entire newsletter for judging?

No. Only specific articles from newsletters may be entered. Newsletter articles should be submitted in the "Trade Publications/Newsletters" category.

May I submit supplemental material?

Any entrant may include a cover letter that is no longer than 300 words. You may wish to mention the story's context, impact or any reactions that may not be readily apparent. Please do not submit additional stories as back-up material.

When is a cover letter required?

A cover letter is required if you are submitting a translated article; the letter must certify the translation's accuracy and the name and contact information of the translator.

Why is it important for me to check the release box allowing AHCJ to put entries on its website?

As part of its effort to help members produce better stories, AHCJ gathers examples of good health journalism to show members. All entrants must check the box granting AHCJ permission to use the work for educational purposes and must also complete the questionnaire.

How will entries be judged?

Each category has its own team of screeners and final judges who are not competing in that category. The full list of screeners and judges will be available on the Association's website. Judges' comments on winning entries will be read at the awards ceremony and be posted on the Web site. Remarks on non-winning entries will not be made public.

What do I get if I win?

First-place winners earn $500 and a framed certificate. They also receive complimentary lodging for two nights and registration for the annual conference April 23-26 in Silicon Valley. First-place winners will be recognized at the conference and will be encouraged to appear on panels to discuss their winning work. If there is more than one entrant on the award, it is up to these winners to divide any prize. Lodging will only be covered for one individual in each category.

What is the deadline for entering the contest?

For the early-bird rates ($30 members, $55 nonmembers), entries must be received by Dec. 19, 2014.

Regular-rate entries ($50 members, $75 nonmembers) must be received no later than Jan. 16, 2015. The online submission system will stop taking entries at 1 p.m. ET. Your entry fees must be received by the deadline for your entries to be considered.

We reserve the right to cancel and refund the entry fees for any category that garners fewer than 15 entries.

To whom should I direct questions?

For more information, send e-mail to contest@healthjournalism.org.

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